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Characterization of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes from the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii)

Characterization of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes from the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii)
Characterization of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes from the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii)
The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is currently threatened by an emerging wildlife disease, devil facial tumour disease. The disease is decreasing devil numbers dramatically and may lead to the extinction of the species. At present, nothing is known about the immune genes or basic immunology of the devil. In this study, we report the construction of the first genetic library for the Tasmanian devil, a spleen cDNA library, and the isolation of full-length MHC Class I and Class II genes. We describe six unique Class II beta chain sequences from at least three loci, which belong to the marsupial Class II DA gene family. We have isolated 13 unique devil Class I sequences, representing at least seven Class I loci, two of which are most likely non-classical genes. The MHC Class I sequences from the devil have little heterogeneity, indicating recent divergence. The MHC genes described here are most likely involved in antigen presentation and are an important first step for studying MHC diversity and immune response in the devil.
tasmanian devil, marsupial, MHC, transmissible tumour, conservation
753-760
Siddle, Hannah V.
2f0c1307-55d3-4965-a8b0-495c4a799f27
Sanderson, Claire
ad07cd7b-8139-4400-8682-3262c0b1d977
Belov, Katherine
53f3bf11-757e-466d-bc93-8958b7a9dae1
Siddle, Hannah V.
2f0c1307-55d3-4965-a8b0-495c4a799f27
Sanderson, Claire
ad07cd7b-8139-4400-8682-3262c0b1d977
Belov, Katherine
53f3bf11-757e-466d-bc93-8958b7a9dae1

Siddle, Hannah V., Sanderson, Claire and Belov, Katherine (2007) Characterization of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes from the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii). Immunogenetics, 59 (9), 753-760. (doi:10.1007/s00251-007-0238-2). (PMID:17673996)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is currently threatened by an emerging wildlife disease, devil facial tumour disease. The disease is decreasing devil numbers dramatically and may lead to the extinction of the species. At present, nothing is known about the immune genes or basic immunology of the devil. In this study, we report the construction of the first genetic library for the Tasmanian devil, a spleen cDNA library, and the isolation of full-length MHC Class I and Class II genes. We describe six unique Class II beta chain sequences from at least three loci, which belong to the marsupial Class II DA gene family. We have isolated 13 unique devil Class I sequences, representing at least seven Class I loci, two of which are most likely non-classical genes. The MHC Class I sequences from the devil have little heterogeneity, indicating recent divergence. The MHC genes described here are most likely involved in antigen presentation and are an important first step for studying MHC diversity and immune response in the devil.

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More information

Published date: 1 September 2007
Keywords: tasmanian devil, marsupial, MHC, transmissible tumour, conservation
Organisations: Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 362988
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/362988
PURE UUID: 3c3e29a6-992d-431b-9b8b-19259b4a9418

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Mar 2014 16:39
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:10

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