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Class I genes have split from the MHC in the tammar wallaby

Class I genes have split from the MHC in the tammar wallaby
Class I genes have split from the MHC in the tammar wallaby
Genes within the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) are critical to the immune response and immunoregulation. Comparative studies have revealed that the MHC has undergone many changes throughout evolution yet in tetrapods the three different classes of MHC genes have maintained linkage, suggesting that there may be some functional advantage obtained by maintaining this clustering of MHC genes. Here we present data showing that class II and III genes, the antigen processing gene TAP2, and MHC framework genes are found together in the tammar wallaby on chromosome 2. Surprisingly class I loci were not found on chromosome 2 but were mapped to ten different locations spread across six chromosomes. This distribution of class I loci in the wallaby on nearly all autosomes is not a characteristic of all marsupials and may be a relatively recent phenomenon. It highlights the need for the inclusion of more than one marsupial species in comparative studies and raises questions regarding the functional significance of the clustering of MHC genes
1424-8581
205-211
Deakin, J.E.
316d5568-d250-48ec-a33c-4ce62b23467f
Siddle, H.V.
2f0c1307-55d3-4965-a8b0-495c4a799f27
Cross, J.G.R.
3023dea7-61f0-40fd-b3fb-fb2e476d285e
Belov, K.
56822ba7-58c0-4657-b046-0e84ccce3a1d
Graves, J.A.M.
33685794-e6c3-4d52-a931-1f13a955e22e
Deakin, J.E.
316d5568-d250-48ec-a33c-4ce62b23467f
Siddle, H.V.
2f0c1307-55d3-4965-a8b0-495c4a799f27
Cross, J.G.R.
3023dea7-61f0-40fd-b3fb-fb2e476d285e
Belov, K.
56822ba7-58c0-4657-b046-0e84ccce3a1d
Graves, J.A.M.
33685794-e6c3-4d52-a931-1f13a955e22e

Deakin, J.E., Siddle, H.V., Cross, J.G.R., Belov, K. and Graves, J.A.M. (2007) Class I genes have split from the MHC in the tammar wallaby. Cytogenetic and Genome Research, 116 (3), 205-211. (doi:10.1159/000098188). (PMID:17317961)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Genes within the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) are critical to the immune response and immunoregulation. Comparative studies have revealed that the MHC has undergone many changes throughout evolution yet in tetrapods the three different classes of MHC genes have maintained linkage, suggesting that there may be some functional advantage obtained by maintaining this clustering of MHC genes. Here we present data showing that class II and III genes, the antigen processing gene TAP2, and MHC framework genes are found together in the tammar wallaby on chromosome 2. Surprisingly class I loci were not found on chromosome 2 but were mapped to ten different locations spread across six chromosomes. This distribution of class I loci in the wallaby on nearly all autosomes is not a characteristic of all marsupials and may be a relatively recent phenomenon. It highlights the need for the inclusion of more than one marsupial species in comparative studies and raises questions regarding the functional significance of the clustering of MHC genes

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Published date: 2007
Organisations: Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 362993
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/362993
ISSN: 1424-8581
PURE UUID: 6e338199-2ae3-49ae-9cd6-d2f865b7bd91

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Date deposited: 17 Mar 2014 14:19
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:10

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