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The potential for bioenergy crops to contribute to meeting GB heat and electricity demands

The potential for bioenergy crops to contribute to meeting GB heat and electricity demands
The potential for bioenergy crops to contribute to meeting GB heat and electricity demands
The paper presents a model system, which consists of a partial equilibrium model and process-based terrestrial biogeochemistry models, to determine the optimal distributions of both Miscanthus (Miscanthus × giganteus) and short rotation coppice willow (SRC) (Salix. viminalis L. x S. viminalis var Joruun) in Great Britain (GB), as well as their potential contribution to meet heat and electricity demand in GB. Results show that the potential contribution of Miscanthus and SRC to heat and electricity demand is significant. Without considering farm-scale economic constraints, Miscanthus and SRC could generate, in an economically competitive way compared with other energy generation costs, 224 800 GWh yr?1 heat and 112 500 GWh yr?1 electricity, with 8 Mha of available land under Miscanthus and SRC, accounting for 66% of total heat demand and 62% of total electricity demand respectively. Given the pattern of heat and electricity demand, and the relative yields of Miscanthus and SRC in different parts of GB, Miscanthus is mainly favoured in the Midlands and areas in the South of GB, whereas SRC is favoured in Scotland, the Midlands and areas in the South of GB
1757-1693
136-141
Wang, Shifeng
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Hastings, Astley
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Wang, Sicong
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Sunnenberg, Gilla
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Tallis, M.J.
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Casella, Eric
3a60adce-ddba-4e72-97e2-5ca161f32954
Taylor, Simon
b70b5e36-4a9c-4f45-b56e-28f15731a122
Alexander, Peter
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Cisowska, Iwona
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Lovett, Andrew
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Taylor, Gail
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Firth, Steven
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Moran, Dominic
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Morison, James
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Smith, Pete
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Wang, Shifeng
8b6d5a58-443e-4fda-b9d1-2c0d44c66c7f
Hastings, Astley
da539d8f-16e4-4898-9b55-1f694d9ff7cc
Wang, Sicong
9f08ac11-b74b-48a5-8d0e-64b7facdb018
Sunnenberg, Gilla
1599365d-0643-49e0-94be-c149304102aa
Tallis, M.J.
25cbd143-1f8c-491b-9eac-f1c632dfcfda
Casella, Eric
3a60adce-ddba-4e72-97e2-5ca161f32954
Taylor, Simon
b70b5e36-4a9c-4f45-b56e-28f15731a122
Alexander, Peter
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Cisowska, Iwona
21e8d0c9-adac-4069-8f2e-a133f1751845
Lovett, Andrew
b75a7fb5-4d52-43c7-88c9-5114df60198b
Taylor, Gail
f3851db9-d37c-4c36-8663-e5c2cb03e171
Firth, Steven
23130861-b2b2-45df-8052-aa27c1b0a463
Moran, Dominic
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Morison, James
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Smith, Pete
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Wang, Shifeng, Hastings, Astley, Wang, Sicong, Sunnenberg, Gilla, Tallis, M.J., Casella, Eric, Taylor, Simon, Alexander, Peter, Cisowska, Iwona, Lovett, Andrew, Taylor, Gail, Firth, Steven, Moran, Dominic, Morison, James and Smith, Pete (2014) The potential for bioenergy crops to contribute to meeting GB heat and electricity demands. Global Change Biology Bioenergy, 6 (2), 136-141. (doi:10.1111/gcbb.12123).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The paper presents a model system, which consists of a partial equilibrium model and process-based terrestrial biogeochemistry models, to determine the optimal distributions of both Miscanthus (Miscanthus × giganteus) and short rotation coppice willow (SRC) (Salix. viminalis L. x S. viminalis var Joruun) in Great Britain (GB), as well as their potential contribution to meet heat and electricity demand in GB. Results show that the potential contribution of Miscanthus and SRC to heat and electricity demand is significant. Without considering farm-scale economic constraints, Miscanthus and SRC could generate, in an economically competitive way compared with other energy generation costs, 224 800 GWh yr?1 heat and 112 500 GWh yr?1 electricity, with 8 Mha of available land under Miscanthus and SRC, accounting for 66% of total heat demand and 62% of total electricity demand respectively. Given the pattern of heat and electricity demand, and the relative yields of Miscanthus and SRC in different parts of GB, Miscanthus is mainly favoured in the Midlands and areas in the South of GB, whereas SRC is favoured in Scotland, the Midlands and areas in the South of GB

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Published date: March 2014
Organisations: Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 363096
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/363096
ISSN: 1757-1693
PURE UUID: 5a13b1b4-a4df-4f65-a6ba-13ca5d80d1c1
ORCID for Gail Taylor: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8470-6390

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Date deposited: 20 Mar 2014 14:13
Last modified: 26 Nov 2019 01:55

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Contributors

Author: Shifeng Wang
Author: Astley Hastings
Author: Sicong Wang
Author: Gilla Sunnenberg
Author: M.J. Tallis
Author: Eric Casella
Author: Simon Taylor
Author: Peter Alexander
Author: Iwona Cisowska
Author: Andrew Lovett
Author: Gail Taylor ORCID iD
Author: Steven Firth
Author: Dominic Moran
Author: James Morison
Author: Pete Smith

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