How important is intraspecific genetic admixture to the success of colonising populations?


Rius, Marc and Darling, John A. (2014) How important is intraspecific genetic admixture to the success of colonising populations? Trends in Ecology & Evolution, 29, (4), pp. 233-242. (doi:10.1016/j.tree.2014.02.003).

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Description/Abstract

Genetic admixture of divergent intraspecific lineages is increasingly suspected to have an important role in the success of colonising populations. However, admixture is not a universally beneficial genetic phenomenon. Selection is typically expected to favour locally adapted genotypes and can act against admixed individuals, suggesting that there are some conditions under which admixture will have negative impacts on population fitness. Therefore, it remains unclear how often admixture acts as a true driver of colonisation success. Here, we review the population consequences of admixture and discuss its costs and benefits across a broad spectrum of ecological contexts. We critically evaluate the evidence for a causal role of admixture in successful colonisation, and consider that role more generally in driving population range expansion.

Item Type: Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): doi:10.1016/j.tree.2014.02.003
ISSNs: 0169-5347 (print)
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science
ePrint ID: 363147
Date :
Date Event
15 March 2014Accepted/In Press
April 2014Published
Date Deposited: 17 Mar 2014 11:41
Last Modified: 17 Apr 2017 14:05
Further Information:Google Scholar
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/363147

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