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Novel methods for the preparation of high purity chalcogenide glass for optical fiber applications

Novel methods for the preparation of high purity chalcogenide glass for optical fiber applications
Novel methods for the preparation of high purity chalcogenide glass for optical fiber applications
Chalcogenide glass is traditionally made by melt quenching of purified elements in a sealed system. Raw materials are weighed and inserted into an ampoule, which is evacuated, sealed and heated to the melting temperature while rockign to ensure homogenization. With this technique, high purity chalcogenides suitable for drawing into low loss fibers can be achieved. In this presentation we describe our work with two alternative methods for chalcogenide glass preparation; open atmosphere melting and chemical vapour deposition. These techniques have the potential to provide higher purity glass and easy scaling of the process. In both methods, a flowing reactive atmosphere allows in situ purification of the melt, something not possible with sealed ampoule methods. We describe these processes, their advantages and disadvantages and provide experimental data on their effectiveness in producing high quality chalcogenide glass.
Hewak, D.W.
87c80070-c101-4f7a-914f-4cc3131e3db0
Huang, C.C.
825f7447-6d02-48f6-b95a-fa33da71f106
Knight, K.
8834be4f-7dce-43fe-bafd-959e5893bd51
Hewak, D.W.
87c80070-c101-4f7a-914f-4cc3131e3db0
Huang, C.C.
825f7447-6d02-48f6-b95a-fa33da71f106
Knight, K.
8834be4f-7dce-43fe-bafd-959e5893bd51

Hewak, D.W., Huang, C.C. and Knight, K. (2011) Novel methods for the preparation of high purity chalcogenide glass for optical fiber applications. 2011 Glass and Optical Materials Division Annual Meeting, Savannah, United States. 14 - 18 May 2011.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Other)

Abstract

Chalcogenide glass is traditionally made by melt quenching of purified elements in a sealed system. Raw materials are weighed and inserted into an ampoule, which is evacuated, sealed and heated to the melting temperature while rockign to ensure homogenization. With this technique, high purity chalcogenides suitable for drawing into low loss fibers can be achieved. In this presentation we describe our work with two alternative methods for chalcogenide glass preparation; open atmosphere melting and chemical vapour deposition. These techniques have the potential to provide higher purity glass and easy scaling of the process. In both methods, a flowing reactive atmosphere allows in situ purification of the melt, something not possible with sealed ampoule methods. We describe these processes, their advantages and disadvantages and provide experimental data on their effectiveness in producing high quality chalcogenide glass.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 2011
Venue - Dates: 2011 Glass and Optical Materials Division Annual Meeting, Savannah, United States, 2011-05-14 - 2011-05-18
Organisations: Optoelectronics Research Centre

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 363166
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/363166
PURE UUID: 5a400f7f-73f4-43e6-ab5d-3e84bfb143b8
ORCID for D.W. Hewak: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2093-5773
ORCID for C.C. Huang: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3471-2463

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Mar 2014 16:52
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:05

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