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A Time-Series View of Changing Ocean Chemistry Due to Ocean Uptake of Anthropogenic CO2 and Ocean Acidification

A Time-Series View of Changing Ocean Chemistry Due to Ocean Uptake of Anthropogenic CO2 and Ocean Acidification
A Time-Series View of Changing Ocean Chemistry Due to Ocean Uptake of Anthropogenic CO2 and Ocean Acidification
Sustained observations provide critically needed data and understanding not only about ocean warming and water cycle reorganization (e.g., salinity changes), ocean eutrophication, and ocean deoxygenation, but also about changes in ocean chemistry. As an example of changes in the global ocean carbon cycle, consistent changes in surface seawater CO2-carbonate chemistry are documented by seven independent CO2 time series that provide sustained ocean observations collected for periods from 15 to 30 years: (1) Iceland Sea, (2) Irminger Sea, (3) Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS), (4) European Station for Time series in the Ocean at the Canary Islands (ESTOC), (5) CArbon Retention In A Colored Ocean sites in the North Atlantic (CARIACO), (6) Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT), and (7) Munida in the Pacific Ocean. These ocean time-series sites exhibit very consistent changes in surface ocean chemistry that reflect the impact of uptake of anthropogenic CO2 and ocean acidification. The article discusses the long-term changes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), salinity-normalized DIC, and surface seawater pCO2 (partial pressure of CO2) due to the uptake of anthropogenic CO2 and its impact on the ocean's buffering capacity. In addition, we evaluate changes in seawater chemistry that are due to ocean acidification and its impact on pH and saturation states for biogenic calcium carbonate minerals.
1042-8275
126-141
Bates, Nicholas
954a83d6-8424-49e9-8acd-e606221c9c57
Astor, Yrene
befc2b32-4cc8-439c-b20e-63c23a3a1a27
Church, Matthew
660a810e-c116-4050-a2f6-16a15bc82ef4
Currie, Kim
2e20a2d5-19d5-43e9-9fb0-2db41d9fc1a3
Dore, John
a0a34e11-3156-4923-b4c5-e74a51a4c3da
Gonaález-Dávila, Melchor
ca12a089-cc63-4a60-a1c0-6720147f96af
Lorenzoni, Laura
d71d41b5-d603-45eb-825e-1892af956006
Muller-Karger, Frank
6549fbe7-0407-44f0-a60a-0d8729d227fe
Olafsson, Jon
da9137d7-53fb-46e6-84b3-ff1198383c3b
Santa-Casiano, Magdalena
6be98c20-3937-4f72-bf61-2972efa0f39a
Bates, Nicholas
954a83d6-8424-49e9-8acd-e606221c9c57
Astor, Yrene
befc2b32-4cc8-439c-b20e-63c23a3a1a27
Church, Matthew
660a810e-c116-4050-a2f6-16a15bc82ef4
Currie, Kim
2e20a2d5-19d5-43e9-9fb0-2db41d9fc1a3
Dore, John
a0a34e11-3156-4923-b4c5-e74a51a4c3da
Gonaález-Dávila, Melchor
ca12a089-cc63-4a60-a1c0-6720147f96af
Lorenzoni, Laura
d71d41b5-d603-45eb-825e-1892af956006
Muller-Karger, Frank
6549fbe7-0407-44f0-a60a-0d8729d227fe
Olafsson, Jon
da9137d7-53fb-46e6-84b3-ff1198383c3b
Santa-Casiano, Magdalena
6be98c20-3937-4f72-bf61-2972efa0f39a

Bates, Nicholas, Astor, Yrene, Church, Matthew, Currie, Kim, Dore, John, Gonaález-Dávila, Melchor, Lorenzoni, Laura, Muller-Karger, Frank, Olafsson, Jon and Santa-Casiano, Magdalena (2014) A Time-Series View of Changing Ocean Chemistry Due to Ocean Uptake of Anthropogenic CO2 and Ocean Acidification. Oceanography, 27 (1), 126-141. (doi:10.5670/oceanog.2014.16).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Sustained observations provide critically needed data and understanding not only about ocean warming and water cycle reorganization (e.g., salinity changes), ocean eutrophication, and ocean deoxygenation, but also about changes in ocean chemistry. As an example of changes in the global ocean carbon cycle, consistent changes in surface seawater CO2-carbonate chemistry are documented by seven independent CO2 time series that provide sustained ocean observations collected for periods from 15 to 30 years: (1) Iceland Sea, (2) Irminger Sea, (3) Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS), (4) European Station for Time series in the Ocean at the Canary Islands (ESTOC), (5) CArbon Retention In A Colored Ocean sites in the North Atlantic (CARIACO), (6) Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT), and (7) Munida in the Pacific Ocean. These ocean time-series sites exhibit very consistent changes in surface ocean chemistry that reflect the impact of uptake of anthropogenic CO2 and ocean acidification. The article discusses the long-term changes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), salinity-normalized DIC, and surface seawater pCO2 (partial pressure of CO2) due to the uptake of anthropogenic CO2 and its impact on the ocean's buffering capacity. In addition, we evaluate changes in seawater chemistry that are due to ocean acidification and its impact on pH and saturation states for biogenic calcium carbonate minerals.

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Published date: March 2014
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science

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Local EPrints ID: 363195
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/363195
ISSN: 1042-8275
PURE UUID: 308435ce-25cd-4442-8744-e4c268305dc6

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Date deposited: 18 Mar 2014 11:30
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:10

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Contributors

Author: Nicholas Bates
Author: Yrene Astor
Author: Matthew Church
Author: Kim Currie
Author: John Dore
Author: Melchor Gonaález-Dávila
Author: Laura Lorenzoni
Author: Frank Muller-Karger
Author: Jon Olafsson
Author: Magdalena Santa-Casiano

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