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Detection of new in-path targets by drivers using Stop & Go Adaptive Cruise Control

Detection of new in-path targets by drivers using Stop & Go Adaptive Cruise Control
Detection of new in-path targets by drivers using Stop & Go Adaptive Cruise Control
This paper reports on the design and evaluation of in-car displays used to support Stop & Go Adaptive Cruise Control. Stop & Go Adaptive Cruise Control is an extension of Adaptive Cruise Control, as it is able to bring the vehicle to a complete stop. Previous versions of Adaptive Cruise Control have only operated above 26 kph. The greatest concern for these technologies is the appropriateness of the driver’s response in any given scenario. Three different driver interfaces were proposed to support the detection of modal, spatial and temporal changes of the system: an iconic display, a flashing iconic display, and a representation of the radar. The results show that drivers correctly identified more changes detected by the system with the radar display than with the other displays, but higher levels of workload accompanied this increased detection.
automation, driving, cruise control, driver, situation awareness, workload
0003-6870
592-601
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Dunoyer, Alain
c2003b34-50ec-4678-a31e-ba9b1b6cab69
Leatherland, Adam
1426de94-b934-41b8-adf9-165ee1ce0740
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Dunoyer, Alain
c2003b34-50ec-4678-a31e-ba9b1b6cab69
Leatherland, Adam
1426de94-b934-41b8-adf9-165ee1ce0740

Stanton, Neville A., Dunoyer, Alain and Leatherland, Adam (2011) Detection of new in-path targets by drivers using Stop & Go Adaptive Cruise Control. Applied Ergonomics, 42 (4), 592-601. (doi:10.1016/j.apergo.2010.08.016). (PMID:20870216)

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper reports on the design and evaluation of in-car displays used to support Stop & Go Adaptive Cruise Control. Stop & Go Adaptive Cruise Control is an extension of Adaptive Cruise Control, as it is able to bring the vehicle to a complete stop. Previous versions of Adaptive Cruise Control have only operated above 26 kph. The greatest concern for these technologies is the appropriateness of the driver’s response in any given scenario. Three different driver interfaces were proposed to support the detection of modal, spatial and temporal changes of the system: an iconic display, a flashing iconic display, and a representation of the radar. The results show that drivers correctly identified more changes detected by the system with the radar display than with the other displays, but higher levels of workload accompanied this increased detection.

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More information

Published date: May 2011
Keywords: automation, driving, cruise control, driver, situation awareness, workload
Organisations: Civil Maritime & Env. Eng & Sci Unit

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 363226
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/363226
ISSN: 0003-6870
PURE UUID: 372f3304-9ba1-4322-a6c9-76f5b9d7a17b
ORCID for Neville A. Stanton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8562-3279

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Mar 2014 16:59
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:40

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