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Rates of warming and the global sensitivity of shallow water marine invertebrates to elevated temperature

Rates of warming and the global sensitivity of shallow water marine invertebrates to elevated temperature
Rates of warming and the global sensitivity of shallow water marine invertebrates to elevated temperature
Assessing the sensitivity of ectotherms to variability in their environment is a key challenge, especially in the face of rapid warming of the Earth's surface. Comparing the upper temperature limits of species from different regions, at different rates of warming, has recently been developed as a method to estimate the long term sensitivity of shallow marine fauna. This paper presents the first preliminary data from four tropical Ascension Island, five temperate New Zealand and six Antarctic McMurdo Sound species. The slopes and intercepts of these three assemblages fitted within the overall pattern for previously measured assemblages from high temperature tolerance in tropical fauna and a shallow slope, to low temperature tolerance and a steep slope in Antarctic fauna. Despite the tropical oceanic Ascension Island being subject to upwelling events, the fit of the intercept and slope within the overall assemblage pattern suggests that the upwelling is sufficiently predictable for the fauna to have evolved the plasticity to respond. This contrasts with previously analysed species from the Peruvian upwelling region, which had a steeper slope than other temperate fauna. The speed and capacity of faunal assemblages to acclimatize their physiology is likely to determine the shape of the rates of warming relationship, and will be a key mechanism underpinning vulnerability to climate warming.
climate change, assemblage, vulnerability, warming, rates of warming, Ascension Island, New Zealand, McMurdo Sound, Antarctica
0025-3154
159-165
Morley, S.A.
25f2fd19-d29e-48b9-a8d3-06c521bd2411
Bates, A.E.
a96e267d-6d22-4232-b7ed-ce4e448a2a34
Lamare, M.
defba935-8c1a-4405-a72d-b352de962698
Richard, J.
94b42213-e9d1-4445-9a02-1b57d874a135
Nguyen, K.D.
07b6e243-2ff9-4dc8-b103-707e0576deb3
Brown, J.
64c8be68-e3cb-49ff-b5b0-525db5f4bcd0
Peck, L.S.
99c7a947-59b4-492b-b783-59fb34afd5dc
Morley, S.A.
25f2fd19-d29e-48b9-a8d3-06c521bd2411
Bates, A.E.
a96e267d-6d22-4232-b7ed-ce4e448a2a34
Lamare, M.
defba935-8c1a-4405-a72d-b352de962698
Richard, J.
94b42213-e9d1-4445-9a02-1b57d874a135
Nguyen, K.D.
07b6e243-2ff9-4dc8-b103-707e0576deb3
Brown, J.
64c8be68-e3cb-49ff-b5b0-525db5f4bcd0
Peck, L.S.
99c7a947-59b4-492b-b783-59fb34afd5dc

Morley, S.A., Bates, A.E., Lamare, M., Richard, J., Nguyen, K.D., Brown, J. and Peck, L.S. (2016) Rates of warming and the global sensitivity of shallow water marine invertebrates to elevated temperature. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 96 (Special Issue 1), 159-165. (doi:10.1017/S0025315414000307).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Assessing the sensitivity of ectotherms to variability in their environment is a key challenge, especially in the face of rapid warming of the Earth's surface. Comparing the upper temperature limits of species from different regions, at different rates of warming, has recently been developed as a method to estimate the long term sensitivity of shallow marine fauna. This paper presents the first preliminary data from four tropical Ascension Island, five temperate New Zealand and six Antarctic McMurdo Sound species. The slopes and intercepts of these three assemblages fitted within the overall pattern for previously measured assemblages from high temperature tolerance in tropical fauna and a shallow slope, to low temperature tolerance and a steep slope in Antarctic fauna. Despite the tropical oceanic Ascension Island being subject to upwelling events, the fit of the intercept and slope within the overall assemblage pattern suggests that the upwelling is sufficiently predictable for the fauna to have evolved the plasticity to respond. This contrasts with previously analysed species from the Peruvian upwelling region, which had a steeper slope than other temperate fauna. The speed and capacity of faunal assemblages to acclimatize their physiology is likely to determine the shape of the rates of warming relationship, and will be a key mechanism underpinning vulnerability to climate warming.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 11 March 2014
Published date: February 2016
Keywords: climate change, assemblage, vulnerability, warming, rates of warming, Ascension Island, New Zealand, McMurdo Sound, Antarctica
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 363254
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/363254
ISSN: 0025-3154
PURE UUID: dd4db6f7-21ae-4e9e-b13d-2407566e5de4

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Mar 2014 11:54
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 05:56

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Contributors

Author: S.A. Morley
Author: A.E. Bates
Author: M. Lamare
Author: J. Richard
Author: K.D. Nguyen
Author: J. Brown
Author: L.S. Peck

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