Narcissism and consumer behavior: a review and preliminary findings


Cisek, Sylwia S., Sedikides, Constantine, Hart, Claire M., Godwin, H.J., Benson, Valerie and Liversedge, Simon P. (2014) Narcissism and consumer behavior: a review and preliminary findings Frontiers in Psychology, 5, 232-[9pp]. (doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00232).

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Description/Abstract

We review the literature on the relation between narcissism and consumer behavior. Consumer behavior is sometimes guided by self-related motives (e.g., self-enhancement) rather than by rational economic considerations. Narcissism is a case in point. This personality trait reflects a self-centered, self-aggrandizing, dominant, and manipulative orientation. Narcissists are characterized by exhibitionism and vanity, and they see themselves as superior and entitled. To validate their grandiose self-image, narcissists purchase high-prestige products (i.e., luxurious, exclusive, flashy), show greater interest in the symbolic than utilitarian value of products, and distinguish themselves positively from others via their materialistic possessions. Our review lays the foundation for a novel methodological approach in which we explore how narcissism influences eye movement behavior during consumer decision-making. We conclude with a description of our experimental paradigm and report preliminary results. Our findings will provide insight into the mechanisms underlying narcissists’ conspicuous purchases. They will also likely have implications for theories of personality, consumer behavior, marketing, advertising, and visual cognition.

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Item Type: Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00232
ISSNs: 1664-1078 (print)
Keywords: narcissism, consumerism, eye movement, self-motives, symbolic goods
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
ePrint ID: 363407
Date :
Date Event
1 March 2014Accepted/In Press
21 March 2014Published
Date Deposited: 25 Mar 2014 11:36
Last Modified: 17 Apr 2017 14:02
Further Information:Google Scholar
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/363407

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