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A novel multiblock immersed boundary method for large eddy simulation of complex arterial hemodynamics

A novel multiblock immersed boundary method for large eddy simulation of complex arterial hemodynamics
A novel multiblock immersed boundary method for large eddy simulation of complex arterial hemodynamics
Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are becoming a reliable tool to understand hemodynamics, disease progression in pathological blood vessels and to predict medical device performance. Immersed boundary method (IBM) emerged as an attractive methodology because of its ability to efficiently handle complex moving and rotating geometries on structured grids. However, its application to study blood flow in complex, branching, patient-specific anatomies is scarce. This is because of the dominance of grid nodes in the exterior of the fluid domain over the useful grid nodes in the interior, rendering an inevitable memory and computational overhead. In order to alleviate this problem, we propose a novel multiblock based IBM that preserves the simplicity and effectiveness of the IBM on structured Cartesian meshes and enables handling of complex, anatomical geometries at a reduced memory overhead by minimizing the grid nodes in the exterior of the fluid domain. As pathological and medical device hemodynamics often involve complex, unsteady transitional or turbulent flow fields, a scale resolving turbulence model such as large eddy simulation (LES) is used in the present work. The proposed solver (here after referred as WenoHemo ), is developed by enhancing an existing in-house high-order incompressible flow solver that was previously validated for its numerics and several LES models by Shetty et al. (2010) [33]. In the present work, WenoHemoWenoHemo is systematically validated for additional numerics introduced, such as IBM and the multiblock approach, by simulating laminar flow over a sphere and laminar flow over a backward facing step respectively. Then, we validate the entire solver methodology by simulating laminar and transitional flow in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Finally, we perform blood flow simulations in the challenging clinically relevant thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA), to gain insights into the type of fluid flow patterns that exist in pathological blood vessels. Results obtained from the TAA simulations reveal complex vortical and unsteady flow fields that need to be considered in designing and implanting medical devices such as stent grafts
0021-9991
200-218
Anupindi, Kameswararao
7ba40902-82f1-46db-bd17-9733416864c1
Delorme, Yann
97ef6b89-d54c-4cf0-aab8-7de02ca5f986
Shetty, Dinesh A.
00810d7e-674b-4eae-b773-2f797f0bb3d4
Frankel, Steven H.
dfe31bbe-795a-422e-bc22-7c2234c43301
Anupindi, Kameswararao
7ba40902-82f1-46db-bd17-9733416864c1
Delorme, Yann
97ef6b89-d54c-4cf0-aab8-7de02ca5f986
Shetty, Dinesh A.
00810d7e-674b-4eae-b773-2f797f0bb3d4
Frankel, Steven H.
dfe31bbe-795a-422e-bc22-7c2234c43301

Anupindi, Kameswararao, Delorme, Yann, Shetty, Dinesh A. and Frankel, Steven H. (2013) A novel multiblock immersed boundary method for large eddy simulation of complex arterial hemodynamics. Journal of Computational Physics, 254, 200-218. (doi:10.1016/j.jcp.2013.07.033). (PMID:24179251)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are becoming a reliable tool to understand hemodynamics, disease progression in pathological blood vessels and to predict medical device performance. Immersed boundary method (IBM) emerged as an attractive methodology because of its ability to efficiently handle complex moving and rotating geometries on structured grids. However, its application to study blood flow in complex, branching, patient-specific anatomies is scarce. This is because of the dominance of grid nodes in the exterior of the fluid domain over the useful grid nodes in the interior, rendering an inevitable memory and computational overhead. In order to alleviate this problem, we propose a novel multiblock based IBM that preserves the simplicity and effectiveness of the IBM on structured Cartesian meshes and enables handling of complex, anatomical geometries at a reduced memory overhead by minimizing the grid nodes in the exterior of the fluid domain. As pathological and medical device hemodynamics often involve complex, unsteady transitional or turbulent flow fields, a scale resolving turbulence model such as large eddy simulation (LES) is used in the present work. The proposed solver (here after referred as WenoHemo ), is developed by enhancing an existing in-house high-order incompressible flow solver that was previously validated for its numerics and several LES models by Shetty et al. (2010) [33]. In the present work, WenoHemoWenoHemo is systematically validated for additional numerics introduced, such as IBM and the multiblock approach, by simulating laminar flow over a sphere and laminar flow over a backward facing step respectively. Then, we validate the entire solver methodology by simulating laminar and transitional flow in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Finally, we perform blood flow simulations in the challenging clinically relevant thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA), to gain insights into the type of fluid flow patterns that exist in pathological blood vessels. Results obtained from the TAA simulations reveal complex vortical and unsteady flow fields that need to be considered in designing and implanting medical devices such as stent grafts

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Published date: 2013
Organisations: Aerodynamics & Flight Mechanics Group

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Local EPrints ID: 363544
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/363544
ISSN: 0021-9991
PURE UUID: 7c7d95a0-6db2-4e4b-8022-593bd2498a4c

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Date deposited: 27 Mar 2014 10:34
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 02:39

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Contributors

Author: Kameswararao Anupindi
Author: Yann Delorme
Author: Dinesh A. Shetty
Author: Steven H. Frankel

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