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Large eddy simulation of powered Fontan hemodynamics

Large eddy simulation of powered Fontan hemodynamics
Large eddy simulation of powered Fontan hemodynamics
Children born with univentricular heart disease typically must undergo three open heart surgeries within the first 2–3 years of life to eventually establish the Fontan circulation. In that case the single working ventricle pumps oxygenated blood to the body and blood returns to the lungs flowing passively through the Total Cavopulmonary Connection (TCPC) rather than being actively pumped by a subpulmonary ventricle. The TCPC is a direct surgical connection between the superior and inferior vena cava and the left and right pulmonary arteries. We have postulated that a mechanical pump inserted into this circulation providing a 3–5 mmHg pressure augmentation will reestablish bi-ventricular physiology serving as a bridge-to-recovery, bridge-to-transplant or destination therapy as a “biventricular Fontan” circulation. The Viscous Impeller Pump (VIP) has been proposed by our group as such an assist device. It is situated in the center of the 4-way TCPC intersection and spins pulling blood from the vena cavae and pushing it into the pulmonary arteries. We hypothesized that Large Eddy Simulation (LES) using high-order numerical methods are needed to capture unsteady powered and unpowered Fontan hemodynamics. Inclusion of a mechanical pump into the CFD further complicates matters due to the need to account for rotating machinery. In this study, we focus on predictions from an in-house high-order LES code (WenoHemoTM) for unpowered and VIP-powered idealized TCPC hemodynamics with quantitative comparisons to Stereoscopic Particle Imaging Velocimetry (SPIV) measurements. Results are presented for both instantaneous flow structures and statistical data. Simulations show good qualitative and quantitative agreement with measured data.
high order large eddy simulation, fontan circulation, viscous impeller pump
0021-9290
408-422
Delorme, Y.
9d953b4b-ae78-4e1e-b4b0-8857db675b3e
Kameswara Rao, A.
e5663e1e-5bed-426d-83df-1a5d9329d8c4
Kerlo, A.E.
b578f56c-feab-46fc-b925-032999d6937f
Shetty, D.
dc95296c-63f8-4322-ad05-0617ed5dc70d
Rodefeld, M.
bc8bbe73-901c-4a2f-a96a-1af28dd965d7
Chen, J.
116323ca-c4fd-4be2-96cb-a54d6cec5cc4
Frankel, S.
edd646ee-93c5-48aa-af30-dc82b01a4f6e
Delorme, Y.
9d953b4b-ae78-4e1e-b4b0-8857db675b3e
Kameswara Rao, A.
e5663e1e-5bed-426d-83df-1a5d9329d8c4
Kerlo, A.E.
b578f56c-feab-46fc-b925-032999d6937f
Shetty, D.
dc95296c-63f8-4322-ad05-0617ed5dc70d
Rodefeld, M.
bc8bbe73-901c-4a2f-a96a-1af28dd965d7
Chen, J.
116323ca-c4fd-4be2-96cb-a54d6cec5cc4
Frankel, S.
edd646ee-93c5-48aa-af30-dc82b01a4f6e

Delorme, Y., Kameswara Rao, A., Kerlo, A.E., Shetty, D., Rodefeld, M., Chen, J. and Frankel, S. (2013) Large eddy simulation of powered Fontan hemodynamics. [in special issue: Biofluid Mechanics] Journal of Biomechanics, 46 (2), 408-422. (doi:10.1016/j.jbiomech.2012.10.045).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Children born with univentricular heart disease typically must undergo three open heart surgeries within the first 2–3 years of life to eventually establish the Fontan circulation. In that case the single working ventricle pumps oxygenated blood to the body and blood returns to the lungs flowing passively through the Total Cavopulmonary Connection (TCPC) rather than being actively pumped by a subpulmonary ventricle. The TCPC is a direct surgical connection between the superior and inferior vena cava and the left and right pulmonary arteries. We have postulated that a mechanical pump inserted into this circulation providing a 3–5 mmHg pressure augmentation will reestablish bi-ventricular physiology serving as a bridge-to-recovery, bridge-to-transplant or destination therapy as a “biventricular Fontan” circulation. The Viscous Impeller Pump (VIP) has been proposed by our group as such an assist device. It is situated in the center of the 4-way TCPC intersection and spins pulling blood from the vena cavae and pushing it into the pulmonary arteries. We hypothesized that Large Eddy Simulation (LES) using high-order numerical methods are needed to capture unsteady powered and unpowered Fontan hemodynamics. Inclusion of a mechanical pump into the CFD further complicates matters due to the need to account for rotating machinery. In this study, we focus on predictions from an in-house high-order LES code (WenoHemoTM) for unpowered and VIP-powered idealized TCPC hemodynamics with quantitative comparisons to Stereoscopic Particle Imaging Velocimetry (SPIV) measurements. Results are presented for both instantaneous flow structures and statistical data. Simulations show good qualitative and quantitative agreement with measured data.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 21 November 2012
Published date: 18 January 2013
Keywords: high order large eddy simulation, fontan circulation, viscous impeller pump
Organisations: Aerodynamics & Flight Mechanics Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 363617
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/363617
ISSN: 0021-9290
PURE UUID: 867f3673-6055-467a-b408-c6e05432d82b

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Date deposited: 27 Mar 2014 16:21
Last modified: 09 Nov 2021 01:10

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Contributors

Author: Y. Delorme
Author: A. Kameswara Rao
Author: A.E. Kerlo
Author: D. Shetty
Author: M. Rodefeld
Author: J. Chen
Author: S. Frankel

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