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Context effects and behaviour change techniques in randomised trials: a systematic review using the example of trials to increase adherence to physical activity in musculoskeletal pain

Context effects and behaviour change techniques in randomised trials: a systematic review using the example of trials to increase adherence to physical activity in musculoskeletal pain
Context effects and behaviour change techniques in randomised trials: a systematic review using the example of trials to increase adherence to physical activity in musculoskeletal pain
OBJECTIVE:

To describe and explore the effects of contextual and behaviour change technique (BCT) content of control and target interventions in clinical trials.
DESIGN:

Review and meta-analysis of 42 trials from a Cochrane review of physical activity in chronic musculoskeletal pain.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Two researchers coded descriptions of target and control interventions for (a) 93 BCTs and (b) whether target and control interventions shared each of five contextual features (practitioners' characteristics, patient-practitioner relationship, intervention credibility, superficial treatment characteristics e.g. delivery modality, and environment). Quality of study reporting was assessed. Effect sizes for adherence to physical activity and class attendance were computed (Cohen's d) and analysed separately.
RESULTS:

For physical activity outcomes, after controlling for reporting quality, larger effect sizes were associated with target and control interventions using different modalities (? = -.34, p = .030), target and control interventions involving equivalent patient-practitioner relationship (? = .40, p = .002), and target interventions having more unique BCTs (i.e. more BCTs not also in the control) (? = .008, p = .030). There were no significant effect moderators for class attendance outcomes.
CONCLUSION:

Contents of control conditions can influence effect sizes and should be considered carefully in trial design and systematic reviews.
0887-0446
104-121
Bishop, Felicity L.
1f5429c5-325f-4ac4-aae3-6ba85d079928
Fenge-Davis, Anya L
b6ec9990-46ad-46bc-a063-407505680a08
Kirby, Sarah E.
9be57c1b-5ab7-4444-829e-d8e5dbe2370b
Geraghty, A.W.
2c6549fe-9868-4806-b65a-21881c1930af
Bishop, Felicity L.
1f5429c5-325f-4ac4-aae3-6ba85d079928
Fenge-Davis, Anya L
b6ec9990-46ad-46bc-a063-407505680a08
Kirby, Sarah E.
9be57c1b-5ab7-4444-829e-d8e5dbe2370b
Geraghty, A.W.
2c6549fe-9868-4806-b65a-21881c1930af

Bishop, Felicity L., Fenge-Davis, Anya L, Kirby, Sarah E. and Geraghty, A.W. (2015) Context effects and behaviour change techniques in randomised trials: a systematic review using the example of trials to increase adherence to physical activity in musculoskeletal pain. Psychology and Health, 30 (1), 104-121. (doi:10.1080/08870446.2014.953529). (PMID:25109300)

Record type: Article

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe and explore the effects of contextual and behaviour change technique (BCT) content of control and target interventions in clinical trials.
DESIGN:

Review and meta-analysis of 42 trials from a Cochrane review of physical activity in chronic musculoskeletal pain.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Two researchers coded descriptions of target and control interventions for (a) 93 BCTs and (b) whether target and control interventions shared each of five contextual features (practitioners' characteristics, patient-practitioner relationship, intervention credibility, superficial treatment characteristics e.g. delivery modality, and environment). Quality of study reporting was assessed. Effect sizes for adherence to physical activity and class attendance were computed (Cohen's d) and analysed separately.
RESULTS:

For physical activity outcomes, after controlling for reporting quality, larger effect sizes were associated with target and control interventions using different modalities (? = -.34, p = .030), target and control interventions involving equivalent patient-practitioner relationship (? = .40, p = .002), and target interventions having more unique BCTs (i.e. more BCTs not also in the control) (? = .008, p = .030). There were no significant effect moderators for class attendance outcomes.
CONCLUSION:

Contents of control conditions can influence effect sizes and should be considered carefully in trial design and systematic reviews.

Text
Control groups in health behaviour change trials_accepted ms.docx - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Published date: January 2015
Organisations: Primary Care & Population Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 364164
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/364164
ISSN: 0887-0446
PURE UUID: 89637fd8-abd9-4199-b18b-9ae9c3308b18
ORCID for Felicity L. Bishop: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8737-6662
ORCID for Sarah E. Kirby: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1759-1356

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Apr 2014 16:05
Last modified: 31 Jul 2019 00:44

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