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DNA conjugates and sensors

DNA conjugates and sensors
DNA conjugates and sensors
Applications of nucleic acids have developed recently to provide solutions for biosensors, diagnostic tools and as platforms for the assembly of complex structures. These developments have been possible as their base sequence can be used to assemble precise structures following simple and predictable rules. Self-assembled DNA can then be amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and this ultimately enables the preparation of synthetic nucleic acids. Their use as molecular tools or DNA-conjugates has recently been enhanced by the addition of other groups including enzymes, fluorophores and small molecules. Written by leaders in the field, this volume describes the preparation and application of these DNA-conjugates. Several have been used as sensors (aptamers, riboswitches and nanostructures) based on the ability of nucleic acids to adopt specific structures in the presence of ligands, whilst others link reporter groups such as proteins or fluorophores to RNA or DNA for detection, single molecule studies, and increasing the sensitivity of PCR. The book will interest researchers in areas related to analytical chemistry, chemical biology, medicinal chemistry, molecular pharmacology, and structural and molecular biology.
978-1-84973-427-1
Royal Society of Chemistry
Fox, Keith R.
9da5debc-4e45-473e-ab8c-550d1104659f
Brown, Tom
a64aae36-bb30-42df-88a2-11be394e8c89
Fox, Keith R.
9da5debc-4e45-473e-ab8c-550d1104659f
Brown, Tom
a64aae36-bb30-42df-88a2-11be394e8c89

Fox, Keith R. and Brown, Tom (eds.) (2012) DNA conjugates and sensors (Biomolecular Science Series), London, GB. Royal Society of Chemistry, 316pp.

Record type: Book

Abstract

Applications of nucleic acids have developed recently to provide solutions for biosensors, diagnostic tools and as platforms for the assembly of complex structures. These developments have been possible as their base sequence can be used to assemble precise structures following simple and predictable rules. Self-assembled DNA can then be amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and this ultimately enables the preparation of synthetic nucleic acids. Their use as molecular tools or DNA-conjugates has recently been enhanced by the addition of other groups including enzymes, fluorophores and small molecules. Written by leaders in the field, this volume describes the preparation and application of these DNA-conjugates. Several have been used as sensors (aptamers, riboswitches and nanostructures) based on the ability of nucleic acids to adopt specific structures in the presence of ligands, whilst others link reporter groups such as proteins or fluorophores to RNA or DNA for detection, single molecule studies, and increasing the sensitivity of PCR. The book will interest researchers in areas related to analytical chemistry, chemical biology, medicinal chemistry, molecular pharmacology, and structural and molecular biology.

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More information

Published date: 2012
Organisations: Molecular and Cellular

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 364180
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/364180
ISBN: 978-1-84973-427-1
PURE UUID: b22256f6-37cb-4dcf-9e66-5b8152a76863
ORCID for Keith R. Fox: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2925-7315

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Apr 2014 11:54
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:16

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