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Microglia and macrophages of the central nervous system: the contribution of microglia priming and systemic inflammation to chronic neurodegeneration

Microglia and macrophages of the central nervous system: the contribution of microglia priming and systemic inflammation to chronic neurodegeneration
Microglia and macrophages of the central nervous system: the contribution of microglia priming and systemic inflammation to chronic neurodegeneration
Microglia, the resident immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS), play an important role in CNS homeostasis during development, adulthood and ageing. Their phenotype and function have been widely studied, but most studies have focused on their local interactions in the CNS. Microglia are derived from a particular developmental niche, are long-lived, locally replaced and form a significant part of the communication route between the peripheral immune system and the CNS; all these components of microglia biology contribute to maintaining homeostasis. Microglia function is tightly regulated by the CNS microenvironment, and increasing evidence suggests that disturbances, such as neurodegeneration and ageing, can have profound consequences for microglial phenotype and function. We describe the possible biological mechanisms underlying the altered threshold for microglial activation, also known as 'microglial priming', seen in CNS disease and ageing and consider how priming may contribute to turning immune-to-brain communication from a homeostatic pathway into a maladaptive response that contributes to symptoms and progression of diseases of the CNS.
1863-2297
601-612
Perry, V. Hugh
8f29d36a-8e1f-4082-8700-09483bbaeae4
Teeling, Jessica
fcde1c8e-e5f8-4747-9f3a-6bdb5cd87d0a
Perry, V. Hugh
8f29d36a-8e1f-4082-8700-09483bbaeae4
Teeling, Jessica
fcde1c8e-e5f8-4747-9f3a-6bdb5cd87d0a

Perry, V. Hugh and Teeling, Jessica (2013) Microglia and macrophages of the central nervous system: the contribution of microglia priming and systemic inflammation to chronic neurodegeneration. [in special issue: Macrophage Heterogeneity, Subsets and Human Disease] Seminars in Immunopathology, 35 (5), 601-612. (doi:10.1007/s00281-013-0382-8). (PMID:23732506)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Microglia, the resident immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS), play an important role in CNS homeostasis during development, adulthood and ageing. Their phenotype and function have been widely studied, but most studies have focused on their local interactions in the CNS. Microglia are derived from a particular developmental niche, are long-lived, locally replaced and form a significant part of the communication route between the peripheral immune system and the CNS; all these components of microglia biology contribute to maintaining homeostasis. Microglia function is tightly regulated by the CNS microenvironment, and increasing evidence suggests that disturbances, such as neurodegeneration and ageing, can have profound consequences for microglial phenotype and function. We describe the possible biological mechanisms underlying the altered threshold for microglial activation, also known as 'microglial priming', seen in CNS disease and ageing and consider how priming may contribute to turning immune-to-brain communication from a homeostatic pathway into a maladaptive response that contributes to symptoms and progression of diseases of the CNS.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 4 June 2013
Published date: September 2013
Organisations: Biomedicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 364193
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/364193
ISSN: 1863-2297
PURE UUID: e8ee49c1-f621-476b-834b-2916c1183527
ORCID for Jessica Teeling: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4004-7391

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Date deposited: 09 Apr 2014 10:04
Last modified: 19 Nov 2019 01:47

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