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Life expectancy differences in Cuba: are females losing their advantage over males?

Life expectancy differences in Cuba: are females losing their advantage over males?
Life expectancy differences in Cuba: are females losing their advantage over males?
Cuba is a developing country at an advanced stage of ageing, with a population growth rate around zero since 2006. The Cuban population shows a high life expectancy (77 years in 2007) and low infant mortality (below 5 per thousand births). Nonetheless, it has maintained a small sex gap (around 4 years) in life expectancy at birth over the last century. This paper examines the evolution of life expectancy at birth, and trends in specific causes of death. The differentials in life expectancy by sex and across time are examined in order to shed light on the narrower sex gap that Cuba shows compared to other countries. Data on population and specific death rates published by the National Statistics and Information Office and Public Health Ministry of Cuba are used. We decompose the mortality rates to determine the impact of age- and cause- specific death rates on the sex differential at three points in time; and on the life expectancy of each sex, from 1987 to 1995, and 1995 to 2007. Our results show that Cuba presents a mix of mortality patterns, with most of the deaths attributable to chronic or degenerative diseases. However, there is also a sizeable proportion of avoidable deaths such as those due to external causes, respiratory diseases or diabetes. Differences between periods are clear. During the economic crisis, male survivorship was seriously constrained while females barely kept their advantage of half of a year; but, in the recovery period, males recovered faster than females.
life expectancy, causes of death, decomposition method, cuba
978-3-319-03028-9
1381-3579
18
265-305
Springer International Publishing
Gomez Leon, Madelin
44f79aad-ff8a-4c16-ae07-23e6fbb7ee9b
Leon Diaz, Esther Maria
dda6a83f-df83-475a-ba17-33901f12a66b
Anson, Jon
Luy, Marc
Gomez Leon, Madelin
44f79aad-ff8a-4c16-ae07-23e6fbb7ee9b
Leon Diaz, Esther Maria
dda6a83f-df83-475a-ba17-33901f12a66b
Anson, Jon
Luy, Marc

Gomez Leon, Madelin and Leon Diaz, Esther Maria (2014) Life expectancy differences in Cuba: are females losing their advantage over males? In, Anson, Jon and Luy, Marc (eds.) Mortality in an International Perspective. (European Studies of Population, 18) Heidelberg, DE. Springer International Publishing, pp. 265-305. (doi:10.1007/978-3-319-03029-6_11).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Cuba is a developing country at an advanced stage of ageing, with a population growth rate around zero since 2006. The Cuban population shows a high life expectancy (77 years in 2007) and low infant mortality (below 5 per thousand births). Nonetheless, it has maintained a small sex gap (around 4 years) in life expectancy at birth over the last century. This paper examines the evolution of life expectancy at birth, and trends in specific causes of death. The differentials in life expectancy by sex and across time are examined in order to shed light on the narrower sex gap that Cuba shows compared to other countries. Data on population and specific death rates published by the National Statistics and Information Office and Public Health Ministry of Cuba are used. We decompose the mortality rates to determine the impact of age- and cause- specific death rates on the sex differential at three points in time; and on the life expectancy of each sex, from 1987 to 1995, and 1995 to 2007. Our results show that Cuba presents a mix of mortality patterns, with most of the deaths attributable to chronic or degenerative diseases. However, there is also a sizeable proportion of avoidable deaths such as those due to external causes, respiratory diseases or diabetes. Differences between periods are clear. During the economic crisis, male survivorship was seriously constrained while females barely kept their advantage of half of a year; but, in the recovery period, males recovered faster than females.

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More information

Published date: 2014
Keywords: life expectancy, causes of death, decomposition method, cuba
Organisations: Social Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 364315
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/364315
ISBN: 978-3-319-03028-9
ISSN: 1381-3579
PURE UUID: 8a0488d5-c99b-423d-b4e3-aebae3bc7cfb

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Apr 2014 14:19
Last modified: 09 Nov 2021 01:13

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Contributors

Author: Madelin Gomez Leon
Author: Esther Maria Leon Diaz
Editor: Jon Anson
Editor: Marc Luy

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