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Glacial flours as a potential source of Fe(II) and Fe(III) to polar waters

Glacial flours as a potential source of Fe(II) and Fe(III) to polar waters
Glacial flours as a potential source of Fe(II) and Fe(III) to polar waters
Supply of Fe to high nitrate low chlorophyll (HNLC) waters, such as the Southern Ocean, is the principle limiting factor for primary production and the associated carbon uptake. Glacial meltwaters have recently been shown to provide a globally substantial input of Fe to both Antarctic and Arctic polar waters. The particulate Fe flux in glacial runoff is several orders of magnitude greater than the dissolved Fe flux and yet little is known, to date, about the potential bioavailability of this particulate Fe. A fraction of particulate Fe may be bioavailable to organisms and thus have a significant impact on biota in HNLC zones. Here, we describe in detail the composition and speciation of Fe released from four different glacial flours. We show that the fraction of labile Fe varies markedly between different flours and is not proportional to total Fe. Furthermore a small fraction of the particulate Fe is available to the Fe(II) selective ligand ferrozine, which indicates active redox cycling on the surface of the flour.
0168-2563
443-452
Hopwood, Mark J.
cb24a4ad-217e-4528-b11b-4dfa3d5a1e09
Statham, Peter J.
51458f15-d6e2-4231-8bba-d0567f9e440c
Tranter, Martyn
42ff1b9c-b38f-4943-ab73-2c2d71d2c48b
Wadham, Jemma L.
fccc19ee-c691-4f95-bbfd-41f4d4f32c57
Hopwood, Mark J.
cb24a4ad-217e-4528-b11b-4dfa3d5a1e09
Statham, Peter J.
51458f15-d6e2-4231-8bba-d0567f9e440c
Tranter, Martyn
42ff1b9c-b38f-4943-ab73-2c2d71d2c48b
Wadham, Jemma L.
fccc19ee-c691-4f95-bbfd-41f4d4f32c57

Hopwood, Mark J., Statham, Peter J., Tranter, Martyn and Wadham, Jemma L. (2014) Glacial flours as a potential source of Fe(II) and Fe(III) to polar waters. Biogeochemistry, 118 (1-3), 443-452. (doi:10.1007/s10533-013-9945-y).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Supply of Fe to high nitrate low chlorophyll (HNLC) waters, such as the Southern Ocean, is the principle limiting factor for primary production and the associated carbon uptake. Glacial meltwaters have recently been shown to provide a globally substantial input of Fe to both Antarctic and Arctic polar waters. The particulate Fe flux in glacial runoff is several orders of magnitude greater than the dissolved Fe flux and yet little is known, to date, about the potential bioavailability of this particulate Fe. A fraction of particulate Fe may be bioavailable to organisms and thus have a significant impact on biota in HNLC zones. Here, we describe in detail the composition and speciation of Fe released from four different glacial flours. We show that the fraction of labile Fe varies markedly between different flours and is not proportional to total Fe. Furthermore a small fraction of the particulate Fe is available to the Fe(II) selective ligand ferrozine, which indicates active redox cycling on the surface of the flour.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 3 January 2014
Published date: April 2014
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 364397
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/364397
ISSN: 0168-2563
PURE UUID: 86556579-2097-43a1-b757-2892f4a2ed24

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Apr 2014 15:32
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:07

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