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Using Cognitive Architectures to Study Issues in Team Cognition in a Complex Task Environment

Using Cognitive Architectures to Study Issues in Team Cognition in a Complex Task Environment
Using Cognitive Architectures to Study Issues in Team Cognition in a Complex Task Environment
Cognitive social simulation is a computer simulation technique that aims to improve our understanding of the dynamics of socially-situated and socially-distributed cognition. This makes cognitive social simulation techniques particularly appealing as a means to undertake experiments into team cognition. The current paper reports on the results of an ongoing effort to develop a cognitive social simulation capability that can be used to undertake studies into team cognition using the ACT-R cognitive architecture. This capability is intended to support simulation experiments using a team-based problem solving task, which has been used to explore the effect of different organizational environments on collective problem solving performance. The functionality of the ACT-R-based cognitive social simulation capability is presented and a number of areas of future development work are outlined. The paper also describes the motivation for adopting cognitive architectures in the context of social simulation experiments and presents a number of research areas where cognitive social simulation may be useful in developing a better understanding of the dynamics of team cognition. These include the use of cognitive social simulation to study the role of cognitive processes in determining aspects of communicative behavior, as well as the impact of communicative behavior on the shaping of task-relevant cognitive processes (e.g., the social shaping of individual and collective memory as a result of communicative exchanges). We suggest that the ability to perform cognitive social simulation experiments in these areas will help to elucidate some of the complex interactions that exist between cognitive, social, technological and informational factors in the context of team-based problem-solving activities.
collective cognition, social information processing, distributed cognition, team cognition, social simulation, group performance, cognitive modeling, cognitive architecture, ACT-R
Smart, Paul
cd8a3dbf-d963-4009-80fb-76ecc93579df
Sycara, Katia
df200c43-d34d-4093-bb4e-493fea2d0732
Tang, Yuqing
0b26bd4d-f1ab-40ab-8517-3dfc10767fa9
Smart, Paul
cd8a3dbf-d963-4009-80fb-76ecc93579df
Sycara, Katia
df200c43-d34d-4093-bb4e-493fea2d0732
Tang, Yuqing
0b26bd4d-f1ab-40ab-8517-3dfc10767fa9

Smart, Paul, Sycara, Katia and Tang, Yuqing (2014) Using Cognitive Architectures to Study Issues in Team Cognition in a Complex Task Environment. At SPIE Defense, Security, and Sensing: Next Generation Analyst II SPIE Defense, Security, and Sensing: Next Generation Analyst II. 14 pp.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Cognitive social simulation is a computer simulation technique that aims to improve our understanding of the dynamics of socially-situated and socially-distributed cognition. This makes cognitive social simulation techniques particularly appealing as a means to undertake experiments into team cognition. The current paper reports on the results of an ongoing effort to develop a cognitive social simulation capability that can be used to undertake studies into team cognition using the ACT-R cognitive architecture. This capability is intended to support simulation experiments using a team-based problem solving task, which has been used to explore the effect of different organizational environments on collective problem solving performance. The functionality of the ACT-R-based cognitive social simulation capability is presented and a number of areas of future development work are outlined. The paper also describes the motivation for adopting cognitive architectures in the context of social simulation experiments and presents a number of research areas where cognitive social simulation may be useful in developing a better understanding of the dynamics of team cognition. These include the use of cognitive social simulation to study the role of cognitive processes in determining aspects of communicative behavior, as well as the impact of communicative behavior on the shaping of task-relevant cognitive processes (e.g., the social shaping of individual and collective memory as a result of communicative exchanges). We suggest that the ability to perform cognitive social simulation experiments in these areas will help to elucidate some of the complex interactions that exist between cognitive, social, technological and informational factors in the context of team-based problem-solving activities.

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More information

Published date: 6 May 2014
Venue - Dates: SPIE Defense, Security, and Sensing: Next Generation Analyst II, 2014-05-06
Keywords: collective cognition, social information processing, distributed cognition, team cognition, social simulation, group performance, cognitive modeling, cognitive architecture, ACT-R
Organisations: Web & Internet Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 364402
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/364402
PURE UUID: ec80bd15-b0aa-4231-9b52-8bbe72577298
ORCID for Paul Smart: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9989-5307

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Date deposited: 24 Apr 2014 23:17
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:46

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Contributors

Author: Paul Smart ORCID iD
Author: Katia Sycara
Author: Yuqing Tang

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