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Hydrothermal contribution to the oceanic dissolved iron inventory

Hydrothermal contribution to the oceanic dissolved iron inventory
Hydrothermal contribution to the oceanic dissolved iron inventory
Iron limits phytoplankton growth and hence the biological carbon pump in the Southern Ocean1. Models assessing the impacts of iron on the global carbon cycle generally rely on dust input and sediment resuspension as the predominant sources2, 3. Although it was previously thought that most iron from deep-ocean hydrothermal activity was inaccessible to phytoplankton because of the formation of particulates4, it has been suggested that iron from hydrothermal activity5, 6, 7 may be an important source of oceanic dissolved iron8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13. Here we use a global ocean model to assess the impacts of an annual dissolved iron flux of approximately 9×108?mol, as estimated from regional observations of hydrothermal activity11, 12, on the dissolved iron inventory of the world’s oceans. We find the response to the input of hydrothermal dissolved iron is greatest in the Southern Hemisphere oceans. In particular, observations of the distribution of dissolved iron in the Southern Ocean3 (Chever et al., manuscript in preparation; Bowie et al., manuscript in preparation) can be replicated in our simulations only when our estimated iron flux from hydrothermal sources is included. As the hydrothermal flux of iron is relatively constant over millennial timescales14, we propose that hydrothermal activity can buffer the oceanic dissolved iron inventory against shorter-term fluctuations in dust deposition.
1752-0894
252-256
Tagliabue, Alessandro
23ecb1dd-3cf4-46eb-b059-637a04f2439b
Bopp, Laurent
771de655-3caf-42ba-8231-40f17d4addc4
Dutay, Jean-Claude
23a44c2e-4b06-4260-85a0-3f66184ee3fc
Bowie, Andrew R.
b693c3a6-8975-4095-ad4b-81a5a3bb1f29
Chever, Fanny
d0e0d02e-a5c7-47e6-a510-15f7a0402eea
Jean-Baptiste, Philippe
dbd119e2-bcc9-4afb-81ab-ab87855fc533
Bucciarelli, Eva
ea6daad8-9a15-4b1f-9b48-538f734e0a23
Lannuzel, Delphine
20a53a4c-fb9a-42b7-b7d7-c32cf83da979
Remenyi, Tomas
9eff54e5-00b1-4fb4-a663-d33f86b828c0
Sarthou, Géraldine
0073ad71-3180-44e7-b76a-1f2fb1178bbc
Aumont, Olivier
6ea5af9d-4c27-42d9-9ba7-749729efa72f
Gehlen, Marion
e4883d9b-b726-46b9-abcd-c2915e5cee51
Jeandel, Catherine
d2a06452-d4f2-4ea5-9205-845b645067c1
Tagliabue, Alessandro
23ecb1dd-3cf4-46eb-b059-637a04f2439b
Bopp, Laurent
771de655-3caf-42ba-8231-40f17d4addc4
Dutay, Jean-Claude
23a44c2e-4b06-4260-85a0-3f66184ee3fc
Bowie, Andrew R.
b693c3a6-8975-4095-ad4b-81a5a3bb1f29
Chever, Fanny
d0e0d02e-a5c7-47e6-a510-15f7a0402eea
Jean-Baptiste, Philippe
dbd119e2-bcc9-4afb-81ab-ab87855fc533
Bucciarelli, Eva
ea6daad8-9a15-4b1f-9b48-538f734e0a23
Lannuzel, Delphine
20a53a4c-fb9a-42b7-b7d7-c32cf83da979
Remenyi, Tomas
9eff54e5-00b1-4fb4-a663-d33f86b828c0
Sarthou, Géraldine
0073ad71-3180-44e7-b76a-1f2fb1178bbc
Aumont, Olivier
6ea5af9d-4c27-42d9-9ba7-749729efa72f
Gehlen, Marion
e4883d9b-b726-46b9-abcd-c2915e5cee51
Jeandel, Catherine
d2a06452-d4f2-4ea5-9205-845b645067c1

Tagliabue, Alessandro, Bopp, Laurent, Dutay, Jean-Claude, Bowie, Andrew R., Chever, Fanny, Jean-Baptiste, Philippe, Bucciarelli, Eva, Lannuzel, Delphine, Remenyi, Tomas, Sarthou, Géraldine, Aumont, Olivier, Gehlen, Marion and Jeandel, Catherine (2010) Hydrothermal contribution to the oceanic dissolved iron inventory. Nature Geoscience, 3 (4), 252-256. (doi:10.1038/ngeo818).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Iron limits phytoplankton growth and hence the biological carbon pump in the Southern Ocean1. Models assessing the impacts of iron on the global carbon cycle generally rely on dust input and sediment resuspension as the predominant sources2, 3. Although it was previously thought that most iron from deep-ocean hydrothermal activity was inaccessible to phytoplankton because of the formation of particulates4, it has been suggested that iron from hydrothermal activity5, 6, 7 may be an important source of oceanic dissolved iron8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13. Here we use a global ocean model to assess the impacts of an annual dissolved iron flux of approximately 9×108?mol, as estimated from regional observations of hydrothermal activity11, 12, on the dissolved iron inventory of the world’s oceans. We find the response to the input of hydrothermal dissolved iron is greatest in the Southern Hemisphere oceans. In particular, observations of the distribution of dissolved iron in the Southern Ocean3 (Chever et al., manuscript in preparation; Bowie et al., manuscript in preparation) can be replicated in our simulations only when our estimated iron flux from hydrothermal sources is included. As the hydrothermal flux of iron is relatively constant over millennial timescales14, we propose that hydrothermal activity can buffer the oceanic dissolved iron inventory against shorter-term fluctuations in dust deposition.

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Published date: 14 March 2010
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science

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Local EPrints ID: 364773
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/364773
ISSN: 1752-0894
PURE UUID: 476c02ed-e163-4a76-bbab-0e871dabc6b0

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Date deposited: 09 May 2014 09:56
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:06

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Contributors

Author: Alessandro Tagliabue
Author: Laurent Bopp
Author: Jean-Claude Dutay
Author: Andrew R. Bowie
Author: Fanny Chever
Author: Philippe Jean-Baptiste
Author: Eva Bucciarelli
Author: Delphine Lannuzel
Author: Tomas Remenyi
Author: Géraldine Sarthou
Author: Olivier Aumont
Author: Marion Gehlen
Author: Catherine Jeandel

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