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REDS: an energy-constrained spatial social network model

REDS: an energy-constrained spatial social network model
REDS: an energy-constrained spatial social network model
The organisation of living systems is neither random nor regular, but tends to exhibit complex structure in the form of clustering and modularity. Here, we present a very simple model that generates random networks with spontaneous community structure reminiscent of living systems, particularly those involving social interaction. We extend the well-known random geometric graph model, in which spatially embedded networks are constructed subject to a constraint on edge length, in order to capture two key additional features of organic social networks. First, relationships that span longer distances are more costly to maintain. Conversely, relationships between nodes that share neighbours may be less costly to maintain due to social synergy. The resulting networks have several properties in common with those of organic social networks. We demonstrate that the model generates non-trivial community structure and that, unlike for random geometric graphs, densely connected communities do not simply arise as a consequence of an initial locational advantage.
MIT Press
Antonioni, Alberto
6e2bfc87-11b9-4850-a84e-5dae12b46e72
Bullock, Seth
2ad576e4-56b8-4f31-84e0-51bd0b7a1cd3
Tomassini, Marco
900e2019-588e-4a83-86d5-c5a108b462f3
Lipson, Hod
Sayama, Hiroki
Rieffel, John
Risi, Sebastian
Doursat, Rene
Antonioni, Alberto
6e2bfc87-11b9-4850-a84e-5dae12b46e72
Bullock, Seth
2ad576e4-56b8-4f31-84e0-51bd0b7a1cd3
Tomassini, Marco
900e2019-588e-4a83-86d5-c5a108b462f3
Lipson, Hod
Sayama, Hiroki
Rieffel, John
Risi, Sebastian
Doursat, Rene

Antonioni, Alberto, Bullock, Seth and Tomassini, Marco (2014) REDS: an energy-constrained spatial social network model. Lipson, Hod, Sayama, Hiroki, Rieffel, John, Risi, Sebastian and Doursat, Rene (eds.) In ALIFE 14: The Fourteenth International Conference on the Synthesis and Simulation of Living Systems. MIT Press. 8 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The organisation of living systems is neither random nor regular, but tends to exhibit complex structure in the form of clustering and modularity. Here, we present a very simple model that generates random networks with spontaneous community structure reminiscent of living systems, particularly those involving social interaction. We extend the well-known random geometric graph model, in which spatially embedded networks are constructed subject to a constraint on edge length, in order to capture two key additional features of organic social networks. First, relationships that span longer distances are more costly to maintain. Conversely, relationships between nodes that share neighbours may be less costly to maintain due to social synergy. The resulting networks have several properties in common with those of organic social networks. We demonstrate that the model generates non-trivial community structure and that, unlike for random geometric graphs, densely connected communities do not simply arise as a consequence of an initial locational advantage.

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Published date: 2014
Venue - Dates: Fourteenth International Conference on Artificial Life, 2014-01-01
Organisations: Agents, Interactions & Complexity

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Local EPrints ID: 364826
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/364826
PURE UUID: ef3c936a-484b-4897-bb23-0fce5ff1ac2c

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Date deposited: 11 May 2014 19:21
Last modified: 09 Jul 2020 16:38

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