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Daily energy expenditure, cardiorespiratory fitness and glycaemic control in people with type 1 diabetes

Daily energy expenditure, cardiorespiratory fitness and glycaemic control in people with type 1 diabetes
Daily energy expenditure, cardiorespiratory fitness and glycaemic control in people with type 1 diabetes
Objective: encouraging daily physical activity improves cardiorespiratory fitness and many cardiovascular risk factors. However, increasing physical activity often creates a challenge for people with type 1 diabetes, because of difficulties maintaining euglycemia in the face of altered food intake and adjustments to insulin doses. Our aim was to examine the triangular relationship between glucose control measured by continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS), objective measures of total daily energy expenditure (TEE) recorded by a multi-sensory monitoring device, and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), in free-living subjects with type 1 diabetes.

Research design and methods: twenty-three individuals (12 women) with type 1 diabetes who were free from micro- and macrovascular complications were recruited. TEE and glucose control were monitored simultaneously for up to 12 days, using a multi-sensory device and CGMS respectively. CRF was recorded as V02 max from a maximal treadmill test with the Bruce protocol.

Results: subjects (mean±SD) were aged 37±11 years, with BMI = 26.5±5.1 kg.m?2, HbA1c = 7.7±1.3% (61±14 mmol/mol) and V02 max (ml.min?1.kg?1) = 39.9±8.4 (range 22.4 – 58.6). TEE (36.3±5.5 kcal.kg?1.day?1) was strongly associated with CRF(39.9±8.4 ml.min?1.kg?1) independently of sex (r = 0.63, p<0.01). However, neither TEE (r = ?0.20, p = 0.36) nor CRF (r = ?0.20, p = 0.39; adjusted for sex), were significantly associated with mean glycaemia measured by CGMS.

Conclusion: higher levels of energy expenditure (due to a more active lifestyle) are associated with increased cardiorespiratory fitness, but not necessarily better glycaemic control. Since increased levels of energy expenditure and good glycaemic control are both needed to protect against diabetes-related complications our data suggest they need to be achieved independently

1932-6203
Valletta, John Joseph
47edb52a-ada5-487b-96bf-21b474c892c2
Chipperfield, A.J.
524269cd-5f30-4356-92d4-891c14c09340
Clough, G.F.
9f19639e-a929-4976-ac35-259f9011c494
Byrne, Christopher D.
1370b997-cead-4229-83a7-53301ed2a43c
Valletta, John Joseph
47edb52a-ada5-487b-96bf-21b474c892c2
Chipperfield, A.J.
524269cd-5f30-4356-92d4-891c14c09340
Clough, G.F.
9f19639e-a929-4976-ac35-259f9011c494
Byrne, Christopher D.
1370b997-cead-4229-83a7-53301ed2a43c

Valletta, John Joseph, Chipperfield, A.J., Clough, G.F. and Byrne, Christopher D. (2014) Daily energy expenditure, cardiorespiratory fitness and glycaemic control in people with type 1 diabetes. PLoS ONE, 9 (5), [e97534]. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0097534).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: encouraging daily physical activity improves cardiorespiratory fitness and many cardiovascular risk factors. However, increasing physical activity often creates a challenge for people with type 1 diabetes, because of difficulties maintaining euglycemia in the face of altered food intake and adjustments to insulin doses. Our aim was to examine the triangular relationship between glucose control measured by continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS), objective measures of total daily energy expenditure (TEE) recorded by a multi-sensory monitoring device, and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), in free-living subjects with type 1 diabetes.

Research design and methods: twenty-three individuals (12 women) with type 1 diabetes who were free from micro- and macrovascular complications were recruited. TEE and glucose control were monitored simultaneously for up to 12 days, using a multi-sensory device and CGMS respectively. CRF was recorded as V02 max from a maximal treadmill test with the Bruce protocol.

Results: subjects (mean±SD) were aged 37±11 years, with BMI = 26.5±5.1 kg.m?2, HbA1c = 7.7±1.3% (61±14 mmol/mol) and V02 max (ml.min?1.kg?1) = 39.9±8.4 (range 22.4 – 58.6). TEE (36.3±5.5 kcal.kg?1.day?1) was strongly associated with CRF(39.9±8.4 ml.min?1.kg?1) independently of sex (r = 0.63, p<0.01). However, neither TEE (r = ?0.20, p = 0.36) nor CRF (r = ?0.20, p = 0.39; adjusted for sex), were significantly associated with mean glycaemia measured by CGMS.

Conclusion: higher levels of energy expenditure (due to a more active lifestyle) are associated with increased cardiorespiratory fitness, but not necessarily better glycaemic control. Since increased levels of energy expenditure and good glycaemic control are both needed to protect against diabetes-related complications our data suggest they need to be achieved independently

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 14 May 2014
Published date: 14 May 2014
Organisations: Bioengineering Group, Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 364946
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/364946
ISSN: 1932-6203
PURE UUID: c5b9dc55-97b4-4d9b-94ec-21edf26144e0
ORCID for A.J. Chipperfield: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3026-9890
ORCID for G.F. Clough: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6226-8964
ORCID for Christopher D. Byrne: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6322-7753

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 May 2014 11:07
Last modified: 17 Mar 2021 02:38

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