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Control strategy for anaesthetic drug dosage with interaction among human physiological organs using optimal fractional order PID controller

Control strategy for anaesthetic drug dosage with interaction among human physiological organs using optimal fractional order PID controller
Control strategy for anaesthetic drug dosage with interaction among human physiological organs using optimal fractional order PID controller
In this paper, an efficient control strategy for physiological interaction based anaesthetic drug infusion model is explored using the fractional order (FO) proportional integral derivative (PID) controllers. The dynamic model is composed of several human organs by considering the brain response to the anaesthetic drug as output and the drug infusion rate as the control input. Particle Swarm Optimisation (PSO) is employed to obtain the optimal set of parameters for PID/FOPID controller structures. With the proposed FOPID control scheme much less amount of drug-infusion system can be designed to attain a specific anaesthetic target and also shows high robustness for ±50% parametric uncertainty in the patient’s brain model
anaesthetic drug, dosage control, fractional order PID controller, physiological organs, PSO
66-70
Das, Saptarshi
e06f2eb0-1e3e-453c-ba78-82eed18ceac9
Das, Sourav
9074774d-5fae-4bba-8dd8-ff109804f733
Maharatna, Koushik
93bef0a2-e011-4622-8c56-5447da4cd5dd
Das, Saptarshi
e06f2eb0-1e3e-453c-ba78-82eed18ceac9
Das, Sourav
9074774d-5fae-4bba-8dd8-ff109804f733
Maharatna, Koushik
93bef0a2-e011-4622-8c56-5447da4cd5dd

Das, Saptarshi, Das, Sourav and Maharatna, Koushik (2014) Control strategy for anaesthetic drug dosage with interaction among human physiological organs using optimal fractional order PID controller. Control, Instrumentation, Energy and Communication (CIEC), 2014 International Conference on, India. 31 Jan - 02 Feb 2014. pp. 66-70 . (doi:10.1109/CIEC.2014.6959051).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

In this paper, an efficient control strategy for physiological interaction based anaesthetic drug infusion model is explored using the fractional order (FO) proportional integral derivative (PID) controllers. The dynamic model is composed of several human organs by considering the brain response to the anaesthetic drug as output and the drug infusion rate as the control input. Particle Swarm Optimisation (PSO) is employed to obtain the optimal set of parameters for PID/FOPID controller structures. With the proposed FOPID control scheme much less amount of drug-infusion system can be designed to attain a specific anaesthetic target and also shows high robustness for ±50% parametric uncertainty in the patient’s brain model

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More information

Published date: February 2014
Venue - Dates: Control, Instrumentation, Energy and Communication (CIEC), 2014 International Conference on, India, 2014-01-31 - 2014-02-02
Keywords: anaesthetic drug, dosage control, fractional order PID controller, physiological organs, PSO
Organisations: Electronic & Software Systems

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 365061
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/365061
PURE UUID: d8483044-0b11-4845-a99e-2cb458de9591

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 May 2014 08:56
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 21:12

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