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How many pennies for your pain? Willingness to compensate as a function of expected future interaction and intentionality feedback

How many pennies for your pain? Willingness to compensate as a function of expected future interaction and intentionality feedback
How many pennies for your pain? Willingness to compensate as a function of expected future interaction and intentionality feedback
Despite increased research efforts in the area of reconciliation and trust repair in
economic relations, most studies depart from a victim’s perspective and evaluate the process of
trust repair by looking at the impact of restoration tactics on victims’ reactions. We focused on
the transgressor’s perspective and present findings from two studies that investigated how the
amount of compensation that a transgressor is willing to pay depends on victims’ reactions to the
transgression (i.e. whether they claim the transgression happened intentionally or
unintentionally) and the time horizon of the relationship between the transgressor and the victim
(future vs. no future interaction). We hypothesized and found that transgressors are willing to
pay less compensation to a victim who believes the transgression happened intentionally (as
opposed to unintentionally), but only so when they share no future interaction perspective
together. When transgressors have a future interaction perspective with the victim, intentionality
feedback does not affect compensation size.
0167-4870
105-113
Desmet, P.
3aaa2975-cb36-46b9-ac2a-58e66c2eb37d
Leunissen, J.M.
7f515e33-ceb7-49c8-95e9-d327a641f965
Desmet, P.
3aaa2975-cb36-46b9-ac2a-58e66c2eb37d
Leunissen, J.M.
7f515e33-ceb7-49c8-95e9-d327a641f965

Desmet, P. and Leunissen, J.M. (2014) How many pennies for your pain? Willingness to compensate as a function of expected future interaction and intentionality feedback. Journal of Economic Psychology, 43, 105-113. (doi:10.1016/j.joep.2014.05.002).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Despite increased research efforts in the area of reconciliation and trust repair in
economic relations, most studies depart from a victim’s perspective and evaluate the process of
trust repair by looking at the impact of restoration tactics on victims’ reactions. We focused on
the transgressor’s perspective and present findings from two studies that investigated how the
amount of compensation that a transgressor is willing to pay depends on victims’ reactions to the
transgression (i.e. whether they claim the transgression happened intentionally or
unintentionally) and the time horizon of the relationship between the transgressor and the victim
(future vs. no future interaction). We hypothesized and found that transgressors are willing to
pay less compensation to a victim who believes the transgression happened intentionally (as
opposed to unintentionally), but only so when they share no future interaction perspective
together. When transgressors have a future interaction perspective with the victim, intentionality
feedback does not affect compensation size.

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Submitted date: 4 September 2013
Published date: 20 May 2014
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 365287
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/365287
ISSN: 0167-4870
PURE UUID: 92c95bee-0153-4a4c-9d88-b266c8f663bf

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Date deposited: 29 May 2014 16:47
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 02:23

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