The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Identifying knowledge gaps hampering application of intertidal habitats in coastal protection: Opportunities & steps to take

Identifying knowledge gaps hampering application of intertidal habitats in coastal protection: Opportunities & steps to take
Identifying knowledge gaps hampering application of intertidal habitats in coastal protection: Opportunities & steps to take
Over the last decades, population densities in coastal areas have strongly increased. At the same time, many intertidal coastal ecosystems that provide valuable services in terms of coastal protection have greatly degraded. As a result, coastal defense has become increasingly dependent on man-made engineering solutions. Ongoing climate change processes such as sea-level rise and increased storminess, require a rethinking of current coastal defense practices including the development of innovative and cost-effective ways to protect coastlines. Integrating intertidal coastal ecosystems within coastal defense schemes offers a promising way forward. In this perspective, we specifically aim to (1) provide insight in the conditions under which ecosystems may be valuable for coastal protection, (2) discuss which might be the most promising intertidal ecosystems for this task and (3) identify knowledge gaps that currently hamper application and hence need attention from the scientific community. Ecosystems can contribute most to coastal protection by wave attenuation in areas with relatively small tidal amplitudes, and/or where intertidal areas are wide. The main knowledge gap hampering application of intertidal ecosystems within coastal defense schemes is lack in ability to account quantitatively for long-term ecosystem dynamics. Such knowledge is essential, as this will determine both the predictability and reliability of their coastal defense function. Solutions integrating intertidal ecosystems in coastal defense schemes offer promising opportunities in some situations, but require better mechanistic understanding of ecosystem dynamics in space and time to enable successful large-scale application.
Coastal protection, Intertidal ecosystems, Ecology, Salt marshes, Biogenic reefs, Seagrass
0378-3839
147-157
Bouma, Tjeerd J.
0f64a6ad-e198-462e-9d30-d6a1f43e25e9
van Belzen, Jim
4fd6eda1-f5ec-42dd-ad3e-78d9b7e2c7f8
Balke, Thorsten
9977cd37-add6-4bbd-bc16-b7656426ec96
Zhu, Zhenchang
e8ff78ad-9803-4e21-b1bf-df62c42b1872
Airoldi, Laura
fca75828-1c89-4e78-838f-ea6e952dff5e
Blight, Andrew J.
54cdfefc-1f7a-402e-b396-9fe05bfa5cde
Davies, Andrew J.
c1db7914-e0e2-48f3-a6af-48e525920fd2
Galvan, Cristina
10d1935f-296e-48ed-9f8d-c2a3509499d1
Hawkins, Steve J.
758fe1c1-30cd-4ed1-bb65-2471dc7c11fa
Hoggart, Simon P.G.
fbb33268-567a-4f78-9ab5-c9cc48fdc811
Lara, Javier L.
a4b12a56-25af-4042-a795-25681cdd968f
Losada, Inigo J.
2ea31ffe-966e-40f9-b742-aefae8363ad3
Maza, Maria
2723d4e2-9222-439a-9df0-f035089c7222
Ondiviela, Barbara
f56b6689-452e-4dc2-945e-d2ebae28da8c
Skov, Martin W.
cd88f083-d45d-4f18-a306-4011ca11b40b
Strain, Elisabeth M.
aca45ef6-688e-48ea-99fe-a7fd9111a747
Thompson, Richard C.
f439ea56-b6dd-48cf-8adb-d9c2ecc6e24d
Yang, Shilun
d0fcf99d-2090-4d16-850d-67eccc2b08bf
Zanuttigh, Barbara
e54851f2-7ac3-4d2d-94dd-561961c592f1
Zhang, Liquan
eca33e02-c5d1-4482-b676-bbacc8a05d60
Herman, Peter M.J.
52ec5988-2d55-4172-b076-5127459838fa
Bouma, Tjeerd J.
0f64a6ad-e198-462e-9d30-d6a1f43e25e9
van Belzen, Jim
4fd6eda1-f5ec-42dd-ad3e-78d9b7e2c7f8
Balke, Thorsten
9977cd37-add6-4bbd-bc16-b7656426ec96
Zhu, Zhenchang
e8ff78ad-9803-4e21-b1bf-df62c42b1872
Airoldi, Laura
fca75828-1c89-4e78-838f-ea6e952dff5e
Blight, Andrew J.
54cdfefc-1f7a-402e-b396-9fe05bfa5cde
Davies, Andrew J.
c1db7914-e0e2-48f3-a6af-48e525920fd2
Galvan, Cristina
10d1935f-296e-48ed-9f8d-c2a3509499d1
Hawkins, Steve J.
758fe1c1-30cd-4ed1-bb65-2471dc7c11fa
Hoggart, Simon P.G.
fbb33268-567a-4f78-9ab5-c9cc48fdc811
Lara, Javier L.
a4b12a56-25af-4042-a795-25681cdd968f
Losada, Inigo J.
2ea31ffe-966e-40f9-b742-aefae8363ad3
Maza, Maria
2723d4e2-9222-439a-9df0-f035089c7222
Ondiviela, Barbara
f56b6689-452e-4dc2-945e-d2ebae28da8c
Skov, Martin W.
cd88f083-d45d-4f18-a306-4011ca11b40b
Strain, Elisabeth M.
aca45ef6-688e-48ea-99fe-a7fd9111a747
Thompson, Richard C.
f439ea56-b6dd-48cf-8adb-d9c2ecc6e24d
Yang, Shilun
d0fcf99d-2090-4d16-850d-67eccc2b08bf
Zanuttigh, Barbara
e54851f2-7ac3-4d2d-94dd-561961c592f1
Zhang, Liquan
eca33e02-c5d1-4482-b676-bbacc8a05d60
Herman, Peter M.J.
52ec5988-2d55-4172-b076-5127459838fa

Bouma, Tjeerd J., van Belzen, Jim, Balke, Thorsten, Zhu, Zhenchang, Airoldi, Laura, Blight, Andrew J., Davies, Andrew J., Galvan, Cristina, Hawkins, Steve J., Hoggart, Simon P.G., Lara, Javier L., Losada, Inigo J., Maza, Maria, Ondiviela, Barbara, Skov, Martin W., Strain, Elisabeth M., Thompson, Richard C., Yang, Shilun, Zanuttigh, Barbara, Zhang, Liquan and Herman, Peter M.J. (2014) Identifying knowledge gaps hampering application of intertidal habitats in coastal protection: Opportunities & steps to take. Coastal Engineering, 87, 147-157. (doi:10.1016/j.coastaleng.2013.11.014).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Over the last decades, population densities in coastal areas have strongly increased. At the same time, many intertidal coastal ecosystems that provide valuable services in terms of coastal protection have greatly degraded. As a result, coastal defense has become increasingly dependent on man-made engineering solutions. Ongoing climate change processes such as sea-level rise and increased storminess, require a rethinking of current coastal defense practices including the development of innovative and cost-effective ways to protect coastlines. Integrating intertidal coastal ecosystems within coastal defense schemes offers a promising way forward. In this perspective, we specifically aim to (1) provide insight in the conditions under which ecosystems may be valuable for coastal protection, (2) discuss which might be the most promising intertidal ecosystems for this task and (3) identify knowledge gaps that currently hamper application and hence need attention from the scientific community. Ecosystems can contribute most to coastal protection by wave attenuation in areas with relatively small tidal amplitudes, and/or where intertidal areas are wide. The main knowledge gap hampering application of intertidal ecosystems within coastal defense schemes is lack in ability to account quantitatively for long-term ecosystem dynamics. Such knowledge is essential, as this will determine both the predictability and reliability of their coastal defense function. Solutions integrating intertidal ecosystems in coastal defense schemes offer promising opportunities in some situations, but require better mechanistic understanding of ecosystem dynamics in space and time to enable successful large-scale application.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: May 2014
Keywords: Coastal protection, Intertidal ecosystems, Ecology, Salt marshes, Biogenic reefs, Seagrass
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 365344
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/365344
ISSN: 0378-3839
PURE UUID: 659cb849-049f-420b-8fb9-1303ffb1b892

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 02 Jun 2014 13:07
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:04

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Tjeerd J. Bouma
Author: Jim van Belzen
Author: Thorsten Balke
Author: Zhenchang Zhu
Author: Laura Airoldi
Author: Andrew J. Blight
Author: Andrew J. Davies
Author: Cristina Galvan
Author: Simon P.G. Hoggart
Author: Javier L. Lara
Author: Inigo J. Losada
Author: Maria Maza
Author: Barbara Ondiviela
Author: Martin W. Skov
Author: Elisabeth M. Strain
Author: Richard C. Thompson
Author: Shilun Yang
Author: Barbara Zanuttigh
Author: Liquan Zhang
Author: Peter M.J. Herman

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×