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The two-tier process of information-seeking and organisational dual-mechanisms: perspectives on improving organisational information systems

The two-tier process of information-seeking and organisational dual-mechanisms: perspectives on improving organisational information systems
The two-tier process of information-seeking and organisational dual-mechanisms: perspectives on improving organisational information systems
Aligning organizational information systems with people’s generic information seeking patterns has been discussed in the disciplines of information sciences and organizational communication, but there had been little interest within IS research community. As a result, the existing conceptual framework of information seeking does not have significant implications for improving information systems in organizations, particularly for those supporting managerial decision-making. In this paper we report the outcomes of an empirical investigation carried out at two leading commercial organizations to capture the essence of its information seeking processes with a specific focus on managerial decision-making. Its main finding is that information seeking in the natural organizational context is a two-tier process consisting of an explicit primary process, which is underpinned by an implicit auxiliary process. Based on this finding, we make the proposition that organizational information systems should be viewed as dual-mechanisms that underpin the two-tier process. Accordingly, the improvements to information systems should always maintain the balance in dual-mechanisms.
Makewita, S.M.
b680750c-ae0e-4025-9e21-895ea24123ed
Makewita, S.M.
b680750c-ae0e-4025-9e21-895ea24123ed

Makewita, S.M. (1970) The two-tier process of information-seeking and organisational dual-mechanisms: perspectives on improving organisational information systems. MIS Quarterly.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aligning organizational information systems with people’s generic information seeking patterns has been discussed in the disciplines of information sciences and organizational communication, but there had been little interest within IS research community. As a result, the existing conceptual framework of information seeking does not have significant implications for improving information systems in organizations, particularly for those supporting managerial decision-making. In this paper we report the outcomes of an empirical investigation carried out at two leading commercial organizations to capture the essence of its information seeking processes with a specific focus on managerial decision-making. Its main finding is that information seeking in the natural organizational context is a two-tier process consisting of an explicit primary process, which is underpinned by an implicit auxiliary process. Based on this finding, we make the proposition that organizational information systems should be viewed as dual-mechanisms that underpin the two-tier process. Accordingly, the improvements to information systems should always maintain the balance in dual-mechanisms.

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Published date: 1 January 1970

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 36537
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/36537
PURE UUID: f3943a6a-b374-4cc6-a114-9f357a5e4e3f

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Date deposited: 07 Jun 2006
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 15:44

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Contributors

Author: S.M. Makewita

University divisions

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