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Parental migration & child mortality in rural South Africa

Parental migration & child mortality in rural South Africa
Parental migration & child mortality in rural South Africa
Levels of adult temporary out-migration are very high in rural South African communities as men and women migrate to pursue employment and education opportunities. The rural home is often considered to be the preferred place for children to grow up, and children are commonly ‘left behind’ in the care of extended family when parents migrate. While the economic benefits of migration for sending households are well-acknowledged, much less is known about the impact of parental absence on the health and welfare of ‘left behind’ children. This paper examines the relationship between parental migration and child mortality using detailed longitudinal data from South Africa’s two rural demographic surveillance systems. Discrete time event history modelling is employed to investigate the relationship between mortality in the first five years of life and maternal and paternal migration status, after controlling for individual, household and community level factors. By comparing results for the two study sites, it is possible to examine similarities and differences in the relationships between parental migration and child mortality in contrasting social and geographical contexts

Antobam, Kojo
ab0ee1bf-decc-4c5f-908d-60658fc4cda5
Collinson, Mark
355f2311-7341-4943-a8ca-2bb7b5672dac
Hosegood, Victoria
c59a89d5-5edc-42dd-b282-f44458fd2993
Bennett, Rachel
53222607-43bd-46d3-9448-1599fd785ac0
Antobam, Kojo
ab0ee1bf-decc-4c5f-908d-60658fc4cda5
Collinson, Mark
355f2311-7341-4943-a8ca-2bb7b5672dac
Hosegood, Victoria
c59a89d5-5edc-42dd-b282-f44458fd2993
Bennett, Rachel
53222607-43bd-46d3-9448-1599fd785ac0

Antobam, Kojo, Collinson, Mark, Hosegood, Victoria and Bennett, Rachel (2012) Parental migration & child mortality in rural South Africa. British Society for Population Studies Annual Conference, United Kingdom. 10 - 12 Sep 2012.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

Levels of adult temporary out-migration are very high in rural South African communities as men and women migrate to pursue employment and education opportunities. The rural home is often considered to be the preferred place for children to grow up, and children are commonly ‘left behind’ in the care of extended family when parents migrate. While the economic benefits of migration for sending households are well-acknowledged, much less is known about the impact of parental absence on the health and welfare of ‘left behind’ children. This paper examines the relationship between parental migration and child mortality using detailed longitudinal data from South Africa’s two rural demographic surveillance systems. Discrete time event history modelling is employed to investigate the relationship between mortality in the first five years of life and maternal and paternal migration status, after controlling for individual, household and community level factors. By comparing results for the two study sites, it is possible to examine similarities and differences in the relationships between parental migration and child mortality in contrasting social and geographical contexts

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 10 September 2012
Venue - Dates: British Society for Population Studies Annual Conference, United Kingdom, 2012-09-10 - 2012-09-12
Organisations: Gerontology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 365845
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/365845
PURE UUID: a80dadcd-9897-4db6-9d85-b8011a652edf
ORCID for Victoria Hosegood: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2244-2518

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Jun 2014 14:01
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:32

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