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Sequence and onset of whole-body coordination when turning in response to a visual trigger: comparing people with Parkinson's disease and healthy adults

Sequence and onset of whole-body coordination when turning in response to a visual trigger: comparing people with Parkinson's disease and healthy adults
Sequence and onset of whole-body coordination when turning in response to a visual trigger: comparing people with Parkinson's disease and healthy adults
Turning round is a routine everyday activity that can often lead to instability. The purpose of this study was to investigate abnormalities of turning among people with Parkinson's disease (PwPD) through the measurement of sequence of body segments and latency response. Participants were asked to turn 180° and whole-body movements were recorded using CODAmotion and Visio Fast eye tracking equipment. Thirty-one independently mobile PwPD and 15 age-matched healthy controls participated in the study. We found that contrary to common belief, the head preceded movement of all other body segments (eyes, shoulders, pelvis, first and second foot). We also found interaction between group and body segment (P = 0.005), indicating that overall, PwPD took longer to move from head to second foot than age-matched healthy controls. For PwPD only, interactions were found between disease severity and body segment (P < 0.0001), between age group and body segment (P < 0.0001) and between gender and body segments (P < 0.0001). For each interaction, longer time periods were noted between moving the first foot after the pelvis, and moving the second foot after the first, and this was noted for PwPD in Hoehn and Yahr stage III–IV (in comparison to Hoehn and Yahr stage I–II); for PwPD who were under 70 years (in comparison with 70 years or over); and for ladies (in comparison with men). Our results indicate that in PwPD and healthy elderly, turning-on-the-spot might not follow the top-to-bottom approach we know from previous research.
0966-6362
278-283
Ashburn, A.
818b9ce8-f025-429e-9532-43ee4fd5f991
Kampshoff, C.
9f051e36-6b6e-4f17-9e9a-aa09a011f22d
Burnett, M.
2c3baa00-d368-4ce7-8a8b-822ea7ebe475
Stack, E.
7adccc27-4910-41bb-adc4-409e00a89601
Pickering, R.M.
4a828314-7ddf-4f96-abed-3407017d4c90
Verheyden, G.
dd0095fa-83d8-4ffd-af2f-fcef6f8a3997
Ashburn, A.
818b9ce8-f025-429e-9532-43ee4fd5f991
Kampshoff, C.
9f051e36-6b6e-4f17-9e9a-aa09a011f22d
Burnett, M.
2c3baa00-d368-4ce7-8a8b-822ea7ebe475
Stack, E.
7adccc27-4910-41bb-adc4-409e00a89601
Pickering, R.M.
4a828314-7ddf-4f96-abed-3407017d4c90
Verheyden, G.
dd0095fa-83d8-4ffd-af2f-fcef6f8a3997

Ashburn, A., Kampshoff, C., Burnett, M., Stack, E., Pickering, R.M. and Verheyden, G. (2014) Sequence and onset of whole-body coordination when turning in response to a visual trigger: comparing people with Parkinson's disease and healthy adults. Gait & Posture, 39 (1), 278-283. (doi:10.1016/j.gaitpost.2013.07.128). (PMID:23973355)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Turning round is a routine everyday activity that can often lead to instability. The purpose of this study was to investigate abnormalities of turning among people with Parkinson's disease (PwPD) through the measurement of sequence of body segments and latency response. Participants were asked to turn 180° and whole-body movements were recorded using CODAmotion and Visio Fast eye tracking equipment. Thirty-one independently mobile PwPD and 15 age-matched healthy controls participated in the study. We found that contrary to common belief, the head preceded movement of all other body segments (eyes, shoulders, pelvis, first and second foot). We also found interaction between group and body segment (P = 0.005), indicating that overall, PwPD took longer to move from head to second foot than age-matched healthy controls. For PwPD only, interactions were found between disease severity and body segment (P < 0.0001), between age group and body segment (P < 0.0001) and between gender and body segments (P < 0.0001). For each interaction, longer time periods were noted between moving the first foot after the pelvis, and moving the second foot after the first, and this was noted for PwPD in Hoehn and Yahr stage III–IV (in comparison to Hoehn and Yahr stage I–II); for PwPD who were under 70 years (in comparison with 70 years or over); and for ladies (in comparison with men). Our results indicate that in PwPD and healthy elderly, turning-on-the-spot might not follow the top-to-bottom approach we know from previous research.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 6 August 2013
Published date: January 2014
Organisations: Primary Care & Population Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 365935
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/365935
ISSN: 0966-6362
PURE UUID: 34308c16-d046-4cc3-89b2-2670bb44bcb0
ORCID for M. Burnett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5481-4398

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Jun 2014 15:21
Last modified: 07 Aug 2019 00:49

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