The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Atypical neural responses during face processing in female adolescents with conduct disorder

Atypical neural responses during face processing in female adolescents with conduct disorder
Atypical neural responses during face processing in female adolescents with conduct disorder
OBJECTIVE: Conduct disorder (CD) in females is associated with negative adult outcomes including mental health problems and personality disorders. Although recent neuroimaging studies have reported changes in neural activity during facial emotion processing in males with CD or callous-unemotional (CU) traits, there have been no neuroimaging studies specifically assessing females with CD. We addressed this gap by investigating whether female adolescents with CD show atypical neural activation when processing emotional or neutral faces.

METHOD: We acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from 20 female adolescents with CD and 20 female control participants while they viewed angry, sad, and neutral faces.

RESULTS: An omnibus group (CD, control) by facial emotion (angry, sad, neutral) analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed main effects of facial emotion in superior temporal cortex, fusiform gyrus, ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and insula, and main effects of group in medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and right anterior insula. Female participants with CD showed reduced medial OFC and increased anterior insula responses relative to healthy controls. There were no significant group × facial emotion interactions. Lifetime CD symptoms were negatively correlated with amygdala, superior temporal cortex, fusiform gyrus, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activity for the contrast "all-faces versus fixation." CU traits were negatively correlated with fusiform gyrus activity for the contrast sad versus neutral faces.

CONCLUSION: Females with CD showed atypical neural activation during the processing of all facial expressions, irrespective of valence. Our results demonstrate that severity of CD symptoms and CU traits is important in explaining abnormal patterns of neural activity.
CD, CU traits, fMRI, face processing, females
0890-8567
677-687
Fairchild, Graeme
f99bc911-978e-48c2-9754-c6460666a95f
Hagan, Cindy
b6dd6664-a926-4fe8-afce-5dcf8335ac5d
Passamonti, Luca
71e1cf10-463b-45f0-acc2-0d74459d9f20
Walsh, Nicholas
964e94a4-4645-4851-8f0e-a07d6e422992
Goodyer, Ian
d8750313-5d41-4f80-8f47-c90007cbf469
Calder, Andrew
4981a9bf-43f0-484a-8dfd-e8d8981de0d8
Fairchild, Graeme
f99bc911-978e-48c2-9754-c6460666a95f
Hagan, Cindy
b6dd6664-a926-4fe8-afce-5dcf8335ac5d
Passamonti, Luca
71e1cf10-463b-45f0-acc2-0d74459d9f20
Walsh, Nicholas
964e94a4-4645-4851-8f0e-a07d6e422992
Goodyer, Ian
d8750313-5d41-4f80-8f47-c90007cbf469
Calder, Andrew
4981a9bf-43f0-484a-8dfd-e8d8981de0d8

Fairchild, Graeme, Hagan, Cindy, Passamonti, Luca, Walsh, Nicholas, Goodyer, Ian and Calder, Andrew (2014) Atypical neural responses during face processing in female adolescents with conduct disorder. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 53 (6), 677-687. (doi:10.1016/j.jaac.2014.02.009). (PMID:24839886)

Record type: Article

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Conduct disorder (CD) in females is associated with negative adult outcomes including mental health problems and personality disorders. Although recent neuroimaging studies have reported changes in neural activity during facial emotion processing in males with CD or callous-unemotional (CU) traits, there have been no neuroimaging studies specifically assessing females with CD. We addressed this gap by investigating whether female adolescents with CD show atypical neural activation when processing emotional or neutral faces.

METHOD: We acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from 20 female adolescents with CD and 20 female control participants while they viewed angry, sad, and neutral faces.

RESULTS: An omnibus group (CD, control) by facial emotion (angry, sad, neutral) analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed main effects of facial emotion in superior temporal cortex, fusiform gyrus, ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and insula, and main effects of group in medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and right anterior insula. Female participants with CD showed reduced medial OFC and increased anterior insula responses relative to healthy controls. There were no significant group × facial emotion interactions. Lifetime CD symptoms were negatively correlated with amygdala, superior temporal cortex, fusiform gyrus, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activity for the contrast "all-faces versus fixation." CU traits were negatively correlated with fusiform gyrus activity for the contrast sad versus neutral faces.

CONCLUSION: Females with CD showed atypical neural activation during the processing of all facial expressions, irrespective of valence. Our results demonstrate that severity of CD symptoms and CU traits is important in explaining abnormal patterns of neural activity.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 12 March 2014
Published date: June 2014
Keywords: CD, CU traits, fMRI, face processing, females
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 366154
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/366154
ISSN: 0890-8567
PURE UUID: a9d71f05-47f6-478e-ab57-2fe87bbd3fc8
ORCID for Graeme Fairchild: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7814-9938

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Jun 2014 15:34
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 00:39

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Graeme Fairchild ORCID iD
Author: Cindy Hagan
Author: Luca Passamonti
Author: Nicholas Walsh
Author: Ian Goodyer
Author: Andrew Calder

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×