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Patients’ views of nurses’ competence

Patients’ views of nurses’ competence
Patients’ views of nurses’ competence
This study examines, from the patients’ perspective, what is meant by competent nursing and how, with this perspective in mind, patients would view the prospect of assessing the competence of nurses.

There is a little empirical research that clarifies professional competence from the patient’s perspective. Nursing curricula in the UK have shifted attention to ‘competencies’ as the outcome of nurse education and, in an era of patient involvement, their views are important to investigate.

The study utilises a grounded theory approach. Data were collected in Central Scotland between 2001 and 2003. Twenty-seven patients participated. Data were analysed, in keeping with the grounded theory tradition, utilising the constant comparative method.

Patients described the foundation of competent nursing practice as technical care and nursing knowledge. Patients assume that technical care is competent as safe guards are considered to be in place to protect patients. When technical competence is assumed, interpersonal attributes become the most important indicator of the quality of nursing care.

The results of this study highlight uncertainty about whether patients feel able to assess the competence of nurses. The results of this study may have implications for nurses internationally when trying to involve patients in the assessment of nurses
0260-6917
719-725
Calman, Lynn
9ae254eb-74a7-4906-9eb4-62ad99f058c1
Calman, Lynn
9ae254eb-74a7-4906-9eb4-62ad99f058c1

Calman, Lynn (2006) Patients’ views of nurses’ competence. Nurse Education Today, 26 (8), 719-725. (doi:10.1016/j.nedt.2006.07.016).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This study examines, from the patients’ perspective, what is meant by competent nursing and how, with this perspective in mind, patients would view the prospect of assessing the competence of nurses.

There is a little empirical research that clarifies professional competence from the patient’s perspective. Nursing curricula in the UK have shifted attention to ‘competencies’ as the outcome of nurse education and, in an era of patient involvement, their views are important to investigate.

The study utilises a grounded theory approach. Data were collected in Central Scotland between 2001 and 2003. Twenty-seven patients participated. Data were analysed, in keeping with the grounded theory tradition, utilising the constant comparative method.

Patients described the foundation of competent nursing practice as technical care and nursing knowledge. Patients assume that technical care is competent as safe guards are considered to be in place to protect patients. When technical competence is assumed, interpersonal attributes become the most important indicator of the quality of nursing care.

The results of this study highlight uncertainty about whether patients feel able to assess the competence of nurses. The results of this study may have implications for nurses internationally when trying to involve patients in the assessment of nurses

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: December 2006
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 366312
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/366312
ISSN: 0260-6917
PURE UUID: 7e259330-afa0-474d-a372-f317bb249f7f
ORCID for Lynn Calman: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9964-6017

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Jul 2014 13:10
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:39

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