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Assessing practice of student nurses: methods, preparation of assessors and student views

Assessing practice of student nurses: methods, preparation of assessors and student views
Assessing practice of student nurses: methods, preparation of assessors and student views
Aims: to describe the methods of measuring progress in achieving competence of preregistration nursing and midwifery students used by institutions of higher and further education in Scotland and to describe the philosophy and approaches to competence assessment in each institution.

Background: institutions of higher and further education in Scotland operate a variety of schemes to assess the clinical practice of student nurses. These are based on different philosophies and practices and this raises the question of which are valid and reliable.

Methods: all institutions in Scotland providing validated Diploma of Higher Education programmes for preregistration nursing and midwifery participated in this study. Data were collected by postal questionnaire, review of programme documentation and supplemented with interviews with key stakeholders. The directors of the 13 programmes (seven nursing and six midwifery programmes) were surveyed and also 12 group interviews with students (six nursing and six midwifery student groups) from seven institutions. Students from all four branches were represented and 72 students (36 nurses and 36 midwives) were interviewed.

Results: four key findings were identified and related to competence assessment methods, preparation of practice assessors, consequences of failure to meet expected level of outcome and students' views.

Conclusions: there has been a change in theoretical frameworks of assessment instruments used since the 1992 programmes commenced and only a limited number of approaches to clinical assessment are used in Scotland. Students' views suggested that they had little confidence in methods of clinical competence assessment and there was no formal validity and reliability testing within institutions. A lack of consistency in the training of student assessors in the clinical areas was identified. Some of these issues may be resolved with the development of a national instrument for competence assessment
0309-2402
516-523
Calman, Lynn
9ae254eb-74a7-4906-9eb4-62ad99f058c1
Watson, Roger
ff53a1bb-ccc6-45f7-ad2c-ecc777e8c623
Norman, Ian
26d682c8-240a-47d7-a763-2507e613ab4d
Redfern, Sally
9811502f-1e81-4252-bc64-3e6175815b1c
Murrells, Trevor
9a57589a-d893-415c-8c3d-8b25d052f42c
Calman, Lynn
9ae254eb-74a7-4906-9eb4-62ad99f058c1
Watson, Roger
ff53a1bb-ccc6-45f7-ad2c-ecc777e8c623
Norman, Ian
26d682c8-240a-47d7-a763-2507e613ab4d
Redfern, Sally
9811502f-1e81-4252-bc64-3e6175815b1c
Murrells, Trevor
9a57589a-d893-415c-8c3d-8b25d052f42c

Calman, Lynn, Watson, Roger, Norman, Ian, Redfern, Sally and Murrells, Trevor (2002) Assessing practice of student nurses: methods, preparation of assessors and student views. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 38 (5), 516-523. (doi:10.1046/j.1365-2648.2002.02213.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aims: to describe the methods of measuring progress in achieving competence of preregistration nursing and midwifery students used by institutions of higher and further education in Scotland and to describe the philosophy and approaches to competence assessment in each institution.

Background: institutions of higher and further education in Scotland operate a variety of schemes to assess the clinical practice of student nurses. These are based on different philosophies and practices and this raises the question of which are valid and reliable.

Methods: all institutions in Scotland providing validated Diploma of Higher Education programmes for preregistration nursing and midwifery participated in this study. Data were collected by postal questionnaire, review of programme documentation and supplemented with interviews with key stakeholders. The directors of the 13 programmes (seven nursing and six midwifery programmes) were surveyed and also 12 group interviews with students (six nursing and six midwifery student groups) from seven institutions. Students from all four branches were represented and 72 students (36 nurses and 36 midwives) were interviewed.

Results: four key findings were identified and related to competence assessment methods, preparation of practice assessors, consequences of failure to meet expected level of outcome and students' views.

Conclusions: there has been a change in theoretical frameworks of assessment instruments used since the 1992 programmes commenced and only a limited number of approaches to clinical assessment are used in Scotland. Students' views suggested that they had little confidence in methods of clinical competence assessment and there was no formal validity and reliability testing within institutions. A lack of consistency in the training of student assessors in the clinical areas was identified. Some of these issues may be resolved with the development of a national instrument for competence assessment

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: May 2002
Published date: June 2002
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 366313
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/366313
ISSN: 0309-2402
PURE UUID: e9e13644-b93c-4101-b452-c0526ce499f0
ORCID for Lynn Calman: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9964-6017

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Jul 2014 13:24
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:39

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