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The Tromsø Study: fit futures: a study of Norwegian adolescents' lifestyle and bone health

The Tromsø Study: fit futures: a study of Norwegian adolescents' lifestyle and bone health
The Tromsø Study: fit futures: a study of Norwegian adolescents' lifestyle and bone health
Summary

Bone mass achievement predicts later fracture risk. This population-based study describes bone mineral density (BMD) levels and associated factors in Norwegian adolescents. Compared with international reference ranges, BMD levels appear higher and physical activity levels are positively associated with BMD.

Purpose

Norway has one of the highest reported incidences of osteoporotic fractures. Maximisation of peak bone mass may prevent later fractures. This population-based study compared BMD levels of Norwegian adolescents with international reference ranges and explored associated factors.

Methods

All first-year upper-secondary school students, aged 15–19 years in the Tromsø region were invited to the Fit Futures study in 2010–2011. Over 90 % of the invited participants attended, 508 girls and 530 boys. BMD was measured at total hip, femoral neck and total body by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Lifestyle variables were collected by self-administered questionnaires and interviews. All analyses were performed sex stratified, using linear regression models.

Results

In girls, mean BMD (SD) was 1.060 g/cm2 (0.124), 1.066 g/cm2 (0.123) and 1.142 g/cm2 (0.077) at the total hip, femoral neck and total body, respectively. In boys, corresponding values were 1.116 (0.147), 1.103 (0.150) and 1.182 (0.097), with significant higher values than the Lunar pediatric reference at 16 years of age. In girls, height and self-reported intensive physical activity of more than 4 h a week and early sexual maturation were positively associated with BMD at both femoral sites (p?<?0.047). Among boys age, height, body mass index, physical activity and alcohol intake were positively (p?<?0.038), whereas early stages of sexual maturation and smoking was negatively (p?<?0.047) related to BMD.

Conclusions

Despite the heavy fracture burden, Norwegian adolescents’ BMD levels are higher than age-matched Caucasians. Physical activity is associated with 1 SD increased BMD levels in those involved in competition or hard training.
population-based study, adolescents, DXA, sexual maturation, physical activity, mineral density
1862-3522
1-11
Winther, A.
04a0f191-c458-4b1c-b48e-8b5e17848235
Dennison, E.
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Ahmed, L.A.
834ccfd6-5a20-459d-9bbf-8a70ebfcfe74
Furberg, A.S.
19ee1356-90b8-4dd1-aeac-f601effd4849
Grimmes, G.
28a652fd-8796-476f-83ed-92a5170289cc
Jorde, R.
8fa55678-cc6b-43dc-ae68-5376b84c23b7
Gjesdal, C.G.
75326fa7-a598-4cb8-9b66-0bbd38881ae7
Winther, A.
04a0f191-c458-4b1c-b48e-8b5e17848235
Dennison, E.
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Ahmed, L.A.
834ccfd6-5a20-459d-9bbf-8a70ebfcfe74
Furberg, A.S.
19ee1356-90b8-4dd1-aeac-f601effd4849
Grimmes, G.
28a652fd-8796-476f-83ed-92a5170289cc
Jorde, R.
8fa55678-cc6b-43dc-ae68-5376b84c23b7
Gjesdal, C.G.
75326fa7-a598-4cb8-9b66-0bbd38881ae7

Winther, A., Dennison, E., Ahmed, L.A., Furberg, A.S., Grimmes, G., Jorde, R. and Gjesdal, C.G. (2014) The Tromsø Study: fit futures: a study of Norwegian adolescents' lifestyle and bone health. Archives of Osteoporosis, 9 (185), 1-11. (doi:10.1007/s11657-014-0185-0). (PMID:24893722)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Summary

Bone mass achievement predicts later fracture risk. This population-based study describes bone mineral density (BMD) levels and associated factors in Norwegian adolescents. Compared with international reference ranges, BMD levels appear higher and physical activity levels are positively associated with BMD.

Purpose

Norway has one of the highest reported incidences of osteoporotic fractures. Maximisation of peak bone mass may prevent later fractures. This population-based study compared BMD levels of Norwegian adolescents with international reference ranges and explored associated factors.

Methods

All first-year upper-secondary school students, aged 15–19 years in the Tromsø region were invited to the Fit Futures study in 2010–2011. Over 90 % of the invited participants attended, 508 girls and 530 boys. BMD was measured at total hip, femoral neck and total body by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Lifestyle variables were collected by self-administered questionnaires and interviews. All analyses were performed sex stratified, using linear regression models.

Results

In girls, mean BMD (SD) was 1.060 g/cm2 (0.124), 1.066 g/cm2 (0.123) and 1.142 g/cm2 (0.077) at the total hip, femoral neck and total body, respectively. In boys, corresponding values were 1.116 (0.147), 1.103 (0.150) and 1.182 (0.097), with significant higher values than the Lunar pediatric reference at 16 years of age. In girls, height and self-reported intensive physical activity of more than 4 h a week and early sexual maturation were positively associated with BMD at both femoral sites (p?<?0.047). Among boys age, height, body mass index, physical activity and alcohol intake were positively (p?<?0.038), whereas early stages of sexual maturation and smoking was negatively (p?<?0.047) related to BMD.

Conclusions

Despite the heavy fracture burden, Norwegian adolescents’ BMD levels are higher than age-matched Caucasians. Physical activity is associated with 1 SD increased BMD levels in those involved in competition or hard training.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 4 June 2014
Published date: December 2014
Keywords: population-based study, adolescents, DXA, sexual maturation, physical activity, mineral density
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 366351
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/366351
ISSN: 1862-3522
PURE UUID: f2040047-19e7-418d-9cc9-87adac7a6990
ORCID for E. Dennison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3048-4961

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Jun 2014 14:06
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:46

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Contributors

Author: A. Winther
Author: E. Dennison ORCID iD
Author: L.A. Ahmed
Author: A.S. Furberg
Author: G. Grimmes
Author: R. Jorde
Author: C.G. Gjesdal

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