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Prenatal calcium and vitamin D intake, and bone mass in later life

Prenatal calcium and vitamin D intake, and bone mass in later life
Prenatal calcium and vitamin D intake, and bone mass in later life
The aging population will result in an increasing burden of osteoporotic fractures, necessitating the identification of novel strategies for prevention. There is increasing recognition that factors in utero may influence bone mineral accrual, and, thus, osteoporosis risk. The role of calcium and vitamin D has received much attention in recent years, and in this review, we will survey available studies relating maternal calcium and vitamin D status during pregnancy to offspring bone development. The evidence base supporting a positive influence on intrauterine skeletal growth appears somewhat stronger for maternal 25(OH)-vitamin D concentration than for calcium intake, and the available data point toward the need for high-quality randomized controlled trials in order to inform public health policy. It is only with such a rigorous approach that it will be possible to delineate the optimal strategy for vitamin D supplementation in pregnancy in relation to offspring bone health.
194-204
Curtis, E.M.
92beef1b-f012-4398-861c-e1156b2adfee
Moon, R.J.
954fb3ed-9934-4649-886d-f65944985a6b
Dennison, E.M.
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Harvey, N.C.
ce487fb4-d360-4aac-9d17-9466d6cba145
Curtis, E.M.
92beef1b-f012-4398-861c-e1156b2adfee
Moon, R.J.
954fb3ed-9934-4649-886d-f65944985a6b
Dennison, E.M.
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Harvey, N.C.
ce487fb4-d360-4aac-9d17-9466d6cba145

Curtis, E.M., Moon, R.J., Dennison, E.M. and Harvey, N.C. (2014) Prenatal calcium and vitamin D intake, and bone mass in later life. Current Osteoporosis Reports, 12 (2), 194-204. (doi:10.1007/s11914-014-0210-7). (PMID:24740166)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The aging population will result in an increasing burden of osteoporotic fractures, necessitating the identification of novel strategies for prevention. There is increasing recognition that factors in utero may influence bone mineral accrual, and, thus, osteoporosis risk. The role of calcium and vitamin D has received much attention in recent years, and in this review, we will survey available studies relating maternal calcium and vitamin D status during pregnancy to offspring bone development. The evidence base supporting a positive influence on intrauterine skeletal growth appears somewhat stronger for maternal 25(OH)-vitamin D concentration than for calcium intake, and the available data point toward the need for high-quality randomized controlled trials in order to inform public health policy. It is only with such a rigorous approach that it will be possible to delineate the optimal strategy for vitamin D supplementation in pregnancy in relation to offspring bone health.

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Published date: June 2014
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

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Local EPrints ID: 366397
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/366397
PURE UUID: 3ff58490-2799-4c2b-8957-0f7bd91b62ab
ORCID for E.M. Dennison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3048-4961
ORCID for N.C. Harvey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8194-2512

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Date deposited: 01 Jul 2014 11:25
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:02

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Contributors

Author: E.M. Curtis
Author: R.J. Moon
Author: E.M. Dennison ORCID iD
Author: N.C. Harvey ORCID iD

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