The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

An investigation into the clinical reasoning of cardiorespiratory physiotherapists using a simulated patient and simulated high dependency unit

An investigation into the clinical reasoning of cardiorespiratory physiotherapists using a simulated patient and simulated high dependency unit
An investigation into the clinical reasoning of cardiorespiratory physiotherapists using a simulated patient and simulated high dependency unit
The ability of physiotherapists to make clinical decisions is understood to be a vital component of achieving expertise and is part of being an autonomous practitioner, yet this complex phenomenon has been under-researched in cardiorespiratory physiotherapy. Educators in this field need to understand what method of clinical reasoning clinicians are using, so that educational strategies can be designed to facilitate the development of clinical reasoning by undergraduate physiotherapy students prior to them going on clinical placement.

This study explored the clinical reasoning of eight expert cardiorespiratory physiotherapists by observing their actions and behaviour whilst they assessed a simulated patient with respiratory complications in a simulated environment. The assessments were video-recorded. The physiotherapists were encouraged to think-aloud to verbalise their thought processes and had a debrief interview afterwards. The videos and the verbal transcripts from the assessment were analysed using a framework analysis and compared to other models of clinical reasoning.

The study has confirmed that clinical reasoning is a complex, multi-dimensional phenomenon and the model produced shares some similarities with other models of clinical reasoning. Four key concepts have been identified as requirements for clinical reasoning development: knowledge acquisition; knowledge storage and retrieval; information processing and cognitive skill development; and metacognition and reflection. These concepts have been incorporated into a new conceptual model of clinical reasoning and embedded into a simulation learning strategy to facilitate clinical reasoning across all three years of the undergraduate physiotherapy programme.
Thackray, Debbie
4336a819-2b42-42bd-863b-2b074b977522
Thackray, Debbie
4336a819-2b42-42bd-863b-2b074b977522
Fuller, Alison
c6b47796-05b5-4548-b67e-2ca2f2010fef
Roberts, Lisa
0a937943-5246-4877-bd6b-4dcd172b5cd0
Nind, Melanie
b1e294c7-0014-483e-9320-e2a0346dffef

Thackray, Debbie (2014) An investigation into the clinical reasoning of cardiorespiratory physiotherapists using a simulated patient and simulated high dependency unit. University of Southampton, Southampton Education School, Doctoral Thesis, 341pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

The ability of physiotherapists to make clinical decisions is understood to be a vital component of achieving expertise and is part of being an autonomous practitioner, yet this complex phenomenon has been under-researched in cardiorespiratory physiotherapy. Educators in this field need to understand what method of clinical reasoning clinicians are using, so that educational strategies can be designed to facilitate the development of clinical reasoning by undergraduate physiotherapy students prior to them going on clinical placement.

This study explored the clinical reasoning of eight expert cardiorespiratory physiotherapists by observing their actions and behaviour whilst they assessed a simulated patient with respiratory complications in a simulated environment. The assessments were video-recorded. The physiotherapists were encouraged to think-aloud to verbalise their thought processes and had a debrief interview afterwards. The videos and the verbal transcripts from the assessment were analysed using a framework analysis and compared to other models of clinical reasoning.

The study has confirmed that clinical reasoning is a complex, multi-dimensional phenomenon and the model produced shares some similarities with other models of clinical reasoning. Four key concepts have been identified as requirements for clinical reasoning development: knowledge acquisition; knowledge storage and retrieval; information processing and cognitive skill development; and metacognition and reflection. These concepts have been incorporated into a new conceptual model of clinical reasoning and embedded into a simulation learning strategy to facilitate clinical reasoning across all three years of the undergraduate physiotherapy programme.

PDF
__soton.ac.uk_ude_personalfiles_users_al4_mydesktop_Final Thesis DT 4-06-14 copy.pdf - Other
Download (3MB)

More information

Published date: June 2014
Organisations: University of Southampton, Southampton Education School

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 366487
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/366487
PURE UUID: c7b12406-ceda-429f-a8ad-2a3b5faa05a6
ORCID for Melanie Nind: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4070-7513

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Oct 2014 11:59
Last modified: 12 Dec 2019 01:38

Export record

Contributors

Author: Debbie Thackray
Thesis advisor: Alison Fuller
Thesis advisor: Lisa Roberts
Thesis advisor: Melanie Nind ORCID iD

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×