The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The effects of changing climate on faunal depth distributions determine winners and losers

The effects of changing climate on faunal depth distributions determine winners and losers
The effects of changing climate on faunal depth distributions determine winners and losers
Changing climate is predicted to impact all depths of the global oceans, yet projections of range shifts in marine faunal distributions in response to changing climate seldom evaluate potential shifts in depth distribution. Marine ectotherms’ thermal tolerance is limited by their ability to maintain aerobic metabolism (oxygen- and capacity-limited tolerance), and is functionally associated with their hypoxia tolerance. Shallow-water (<200 m depth) marine invertebrates and fishes demonstrate limited tolerance of increasing hydrostatic pressure (pressure exerted by the overlying mass of water), and hyperbaric (increased pressure) tolerance is proposed to depend on the ability to maintain aerobic metabolism, too. Here, we report significant correlation between the hypoxia thresholds and the hyperbaric thresholds of taxonomic groups of shallow-water fauna, suggesting that pressure tolerance is indeed oxygen-limited. Consequently, it appears that the combined effects of temperature, pressure, and oxygen concentration constrain the fundamental ecological niches (FENs) of marine invertebrates and fishes. Including depth in a conceptual model of oxygen- and capacity-limited FENs’ responses to ocean warming and deoxygenation confirms previous predictions made based solely on consideration of the latitudinal effects of ocean warming (e.g. Cheung et al., 2009), that polar taxa are most vulnerable to the effects of climate change, with Arctic fauna experiencing the greatest FEN contraction. In contrast, the inclusion of depth in the conceptual model reveals for the first time that temperate fauna as well as tropical fauna may experience substantial FEN expansion with ocean warming and deoxygenation, rather than FEN maintenance or contraction suggested by solely considering latitudinal range shifts.
bathymetric, climate change, fundamental ecological niche, hydrostatic pressure, oxygen, physiology, range shift, temperature
1354-1013
173-180
Brown, Alastair
909f34db-bc9c-403f-ba8f-31aee1c00161
Thatje, Sven
f1011fe3-1048-40c0-97c1-e93b796e6533
Brown, Alastair
909f34db-bc9c-403f-ba8f-31aee1c00161
Thatje, Sven
f1011fe3-1048-40c0-97c1-e93b796e6533

Brown, Alastair and Thatje, Sven (2015) The effects of changing climate on faunal depth distributions determine winners and losers. Global Change Biology, 21 (1), 173-180. (doi:10.1111/gcb.12680).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Changing climate is predicted to impact all depths of the global oceans, yet projections of range shifts in marine faunal distributions in response to changing climate seldom evaluate potential shifts in depth distribution. Marine ectotherms’ thermal tolerance is limited by their ability to maintain aerobic metabolism (oxygen- and capacity-limited tolerance), and is functionally associated with their hypoxia tolerance. Shallow-water (<200 m depth) marine invertebrates and fishes demonstrate limited tolerance of increasing hydrostatic pressure (pressure exerted by the overlying mass of water), and hyperbaric (increased pressure) tolerance is proposed to depend on the ability to maintain aerobic metabolism, too. Here, we report significant correlation between the hypoxia thresholds and the hyperbaric thresholds of taxonomic groups of shallow-water fauna, suggesting that pressure tolerance is indeed oxygen-limited. Consequently, it appears that the combined effects of temperature, pressure, and oxygen concentration constrain the fundamental ecological niches (FENs) of marine invertebrates and fishes. Including depth in a conceptual model of oxygen- and capacity-limited FENs’ responses to ocean warming and deoxygenation confirms previous predictions made based solely on consideration of the latitudinal effects of ocean warming (e.g. Cheung et al., 2009), that polar taxa are most vulnerable to the effects of climate change, with Arctic fauna experiencing the greatest FEN contraction. In contrast, the inclusion of depth in the conceptual model reveals for the first time that temperate fauna as well as tropical fauna may experience substantial FEN expansion with ocean warming and deoxygenation, rather than FEN maintenance or contraction suggested by solely considering latitudinal range shifts.

Text
Brown&Thatje_GCB_15.pdf - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (438kB)

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 31 July 2014
Published date: January 2015
Keywords: bathymetric, climate change, fundamental ecological niche, hydrostatic pressure, oxygen, physiology, range shift, temperature
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science, Southampton Marine & Maritime Institute

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 366590
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/366590
ISSN: 1354-1013
PURE UUID: 843f4be3-b0f9-4c9e-ac0b-77d79216b1d8

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Jul 2014 08:35
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 21:09

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×