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Perceptions of junior doctors and undergraduate medical students as anatomy teachers: investigating the impact of distance along the near-peer teaching spectrum

Perceptions of junior doctors and undergraduate medical students as anatomy teachers: investigating the impact of distance along the near-peer teaching spectrum
Perceptions of junior doctors and undergraduate medical students as anatomy teachers: investigating the impact of distance along the near-peer teaching spectrum
Near-peer teaching involves more experienced students acting as tutors and has been widely used in anatomy education. This approach has many advantages for the learner due to the social and cognitive congruence they share with the teacher, however, the influence of distance between the teacher and learner on these congruences has yet to be explored. The aim of this study was to compare the attitudes and perceptions of the student learner towards neuroanatomy review sessions taught by either a senior medical student or a junior doctor. The students were randomly assigned to an allocated tutor. All tutors used standardized material and had access to identical resources. The type of allocated tutor was swapped between the two teaching sessions and 99 student feedback forms were collected in total. The rating for the overall quality of the teaching session was not significantly different between the junior doctors and senior medical students (P = 0.11). However, criteria closely relating to social and cognitive congruence such as "enjoyment of the session," "delivery of the teaching," and "was it a good use of time" were all rated significantly higher for the senior medical students (P < 0.05). The results of this study suggest that small increases in distance along the near-peer teaching spectrum have an impact upon the student's perception of their learning experience. While all teachers were suitable role models it appears that junior doctors are too far removed from their own undergraduate experiences to share congruences with pre-clinical medical students.
educational methodology, effectiveness of anatomy education, teaching of neuroscience/neuroanatomy, undergraduate medical education
1935-9772
242-247
Hall, S.
a11a8f8b-d6fb-47a7-82b1-1f76d2f170dc
Stephens, J.
ae67a7ba-7959-4938-958c-df85c3f11b76
Andrade, M.G.
29dc50fc-8b2c-4bb8-8d23-2a5515e1ba3f
Davids, J.
209fa68e-9ba8-4c64-a448-4be402d451c1
Powell, D.
ceb7f977-506d-479f-a0af-97d8028c332f
Border, S.
67fce2e0-d2cd-43a2-a9cc-e6cb6fd28544
Hall, S.
a11a8f8b-d6fb-47a7-82b1-1f76d2f170dc
Stephens, J.
ae67a7ba-7959-4938-958c-df85c3f11b76
Andrade, M.G.
29dc50fc-8b2c-4bb8-8d23-2a5515e1ba3f
Davids, J.
209fa68e-9ba8-4c64-a448-4be402d451c1
Powell, D.
ceb7f977-506d-479f-a0af-97d8028c332f
Border, S.
67fce2e0-d2cd-43a2-a9cc-e6cb6fd28544

Hall, S., Stephens, J., Andrade, M.G., Davids, J., Powell, D. and Border, S. (2014) Perceptions of junior doctors and undergraduate medical students as anatomy teachers: investigating the impact of distance along the near-peer teaching spectrum. Anatomical Sciences Education, 7 (3), 242-247. (doi:10.1002/ase). (PMID:24170449)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Near-peer teaching involves more experienced students acting as tutors and has been widely used in anatomy education. This approach has many advantages for the learner due to the social and cognitive congruence they share with the teacher, however, the influence of distance between the teacher and learner on these congruences has yet to be explored. The aim of this study was to compare the attitudes and perceptions of the student learner towards neuroanatomy review sessions taught by either a senior medical student or a junior doctor. The students were randomly assigned to an allocated tutor. All tutors used standardized material and had access to identical resources. The type of allocated tutor was swapped between the two teaching sessions and 99 student feedback forms were collected in total. The rating for the overall quality of the teaching session was not significantly different between the junior doctors and senior medical students (P = 0.11). However, criteria closely relating to social and cognitive congruence such as "enjoyment of the session," "delivery of the teaching," and "was it a good use of time" were all rated significantly higher for the senior medical students (P < 0.05). The results of this study suggest that small increases in distance along the near-peer teaching spectrum have an impact upon the student's perception of their learning experience. While all teachers were suitable role models it appears that junior doctors are too far removed from their own undergraduate experiences to share congruences with pre-clinical medical students.

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e-pub ahead of print date: October 2013
Published date: May 2014
Keywords: educational methodology, effectiveness of anatomy education, teaching of neuroscience/neuroanatomy, undergraduate medical education
Organisations: Medical Education

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Local EPrints ID: 366825
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/366825
ISSN: 1935-9772
PURE UUID: d70a116a-5aa0-48b2-a84c-19a658a55967

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Date deposited: 14 Jul 2014 10:36
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:01

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Contributors

Author: S. Hall
Author: J. Stephens
Author: M.G. Andrade
Author: J. Davids
Author: D. Powell
Author: S. Border

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