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Alarm initiated activities: matching visual formats to alarm handling 'tasks'

Alarm initiated activities: matching visual formats to alarm handling 'tasks'
Alarm initiated activities: matching visual formats to alarm handling 'tasks'
This paper addresses the selection of visual alarm formats for different 'alarm initiated activities'. The activities under examination were alarm handling tasks. Seven such tasks have been identified, namely: observe, accept, analyse, investigate, correct, monitor and reset. One of the most important stages is the initial analysis of the alarm information as this determines the subsequent manner in which the information is processed. It was hypothesised that the format in which the information is presented will determine the success of the alarm handling task, hence the proposal to match formats to tasks. The findings suggest that text-based formats are best suited to tasks requiring time-based reasoning, mimic formats are best suited to tasks requiring spatial location and annunciator formats are best suited to tasks requiring recognition of spatial patterns. The importance of considering both reaction time and accuracy of response in consideration of task match was also noted. In summary, it is suggested that care needs to be taken to determine the appropriateness of the medium for any given task and the demands it places on the human operator
978-0748401093
93-117
Taylor & Francis
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Stammers, Robert. B.
382e9f0d-7bf7-45d4-92ba-e3e7d0968ba6
Stanton, Neville A.
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Stammers, Robert. B.
382e9f0d-7bf7-45d4-92ba-e3e7d0968ba6
Stanton, Neville A.

Stanton, Neville A. and Stammers, Robert. B. (1994) Alarm initiated activities: matching visual formats to alarm handling 'tasks'. In, Stanton, Neville A. (ed.) Human Factors in Alarm Design. London, GB. Taylor & Francis, pp. 93-117.

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

This paper addresses the selection of visual alarm formats for different 'alarm initiated activities'. The activities under examination were alarm handling tasks. Seven such tasks have been identified, namely: observe, accept, analyse, investigate, correct, monitor and reset. One of the most important stages is the initial analysis of the alarm information as this determines the subsequent manner in which the information is processed. It was hypothesised that the format in which the information is presented will determine the success of the alarm handling task, hence the proposal to match formats to tasks. The findings suggest that text-based formats are best suited to tasks requiring time-based reasoning, mimic formats are best suited to tasks requiring spatial location and annunciator formats are best suited to tasks requiring recognition of spatial patterns. The importance of considering both reaction time and accuracy of response in consideration of task match was also noted. In summary, it is suggested that care needs to be taken to determine the appropriateness of the medium for any given task and the demands it places on the human operator

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Published date: 28 February 1994
Organisations: Transportation Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 366898
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/366898
ISBN: 978-0748401093
PURE UUID: 83f5362e-5ace-4225-aeb0-e8eac8aedbec

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Date deposited: 18 Jul 2014 14:43
Last modified: 08 Apr 2019 16:32

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