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Neisseria proteomics for antigen discovery and vaccine development

Neisseria proteomics for antigen discovery and vaccine development
Neisseria proteomics for antigen discovery and vaccine development
Neisseria meningitidis (meningococcus) is a major causative organism of meningitis and sepsis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonococcus) is the causative organism of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea. Infections caused by meningococci are vaccine-preventable, whereas gonococcal vaccine research and development has languished for decades and the correlates of protection are still largely unknown. In the past two decades, complementary ‘omic’ platforms have been developed to interrogate Neisseria genomes and gene products. Proteomic techniques applied to whole Neisseria bacteria, outer membranes and outer membrane vesicle vaccines have generated protein maps and also allowed the examination of environmental stresses on protein expression. In particular, immuno-proteomics has identified proteins whose expression is correlated with the development of human natural immunity to meningococcal infection and colonization and following vaccination. Neisseria proteomic techniques have produced a catalog of potential vaccine antigens and investigating the functional and biological properties of these proteins could finally provide ‘universal’ Neisseria vaccines.


biological and environmental stress, immuno-proteome, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Neisseria lactamica, Neisseria meningitidis, outer membrane, proteome, vaccine antigen, vesicle biological and environmental stress, neisseria gonorrhoeae, neisseria lactamica, neisseria meningitidis, vesicle
1-19
Christodoulides, Myron
eba99148-620c-452a-a334-c1a52ba94078
Christodoulides, Myron
eba99148-620c-452a-a334-c1a52ba94078

Christodoulides, Myron (2014) Neisseria proteomics for antigen discovery and vaccine development. Expert Review of Proteomics, 1-19. (doi:10.1586/14789450.2014.938640).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Neisseria meningitidis (meningococcus) is a major causative organism of meningitis and sepsis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonococcus) is the causative organism of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea. Infections caused by meningococci are vaccine-preventable, whereas gonococcal vaccine research and development has languished for decades and the correlates of protection are still largely unknown. In the past two decades, complementary ‘omic’ platforms have been developed to interrogate Neisseria genomes and gene products. Proteomic techniques applied to whole Neisseria bacteria, outer membranes and outer membrane vesicle vaccines have generated protein maps and also allowed the examination of environmental stresses on protein expression. In particular, immuno-proteomics has identified proteins whose expression is correlated with the development of human natural immunity to meningococcal infection and colonization and following vaccination. Neisseria proteomic techniques have produced a catalog of potential vaccine antigens and investigating the functional and biological properties of these proteins could finally provide ‘universal’ Neisseria vaccines.


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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 12 July 2014
Keywords: biological and environmental stress, immuno-proteome, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Neisseria lactamica, Neisseria meningitidis, outer membrane, proteome, vaccine antigen, vesicle biological and environmental stress, neisseria gonorrhoeae, neisseria lactamica, neisseria meningitidis, vesicle
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 366915
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/366915
PURE UUID: a4ec555c-9782-4076-a9c9-ea0c577e1eaa

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Jul 2014 09:10
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 02:06

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