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A field study of team working in a new human supervisory control system

A field study of team working in a new human supervisory control system
A field study of team working in a new human supervisory control system
This paper presents a case study of an investigation into team behaviour in an energy distribution company. The main aim was to investigate the impact of major changes in the company on system performance, comprising human and technical elements. A socio-technical systems approach was adopted. There were main differences between the teams investigated in the study: the time of year each control room was studied (i.e. summer or winter), the stage of development each team was in (i.e. < 3 months or > 10 months), and the team structure (i.e. hierarchical or heterarchical). In all other respects the control rooms were the same: employing the same technology and within the same organization. The main findings were: the teams studied in the winter months were engaged in more ‘planning’ and ‘awareness’ type of activities than those studies in the summer months. Newer teams seem to be engaged in more sharing of information than older teams, which may be indicative of the development process. One of the hierarchical teams was engaged in more ‘system-driven’ activities than the heterarchical team studied at the same time of year. Finally, in general, the heterarchical team perceived a greater degree of team working culture than its hierarchical counterparts. This applied research project confirms findings from laboratory research and emphasizes the importance of involving ergonomics in the design of team working in human supervisory control
1366-5847
1190-1209
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Ashleigh, MJ.
f2a64ca7-435b-4ad7-8db5-33b735766e46
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Ashleigh, MJ.
f2a64ca7-435b-4ad7-8db5-33b735766e46

Stanton, Neville A. and Ashleigh, MJ. (2000) A field study of team working in a new human supervisory control system. Ergonomics, 43 (8), 1190-1209. (doi:10.1080/00140130050084941).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper presents a case study of an investigation into team behaviour in an energy distribution company. The main aim was to investigate the impact of major changes in the company on system performance, comprising human and technical elements. A socio-technical systems approach was adopted. There were main differences between the teams investigated in the study: the time of year each control room was studied (i.e. summer or winter), the stage of development each team was in (i.e. < 3 months or > 10 months), and the team structure (i.e. hierarchical or heterarchical). In all other respects the control rooms were the same: employing the same technology and within the same organization. The main findings were: the teams studied in the winter months were engaged in more ‘planning’ and ‘awareness’ type of activities than those studies in the summer months. Newer teams seem to be engaged in more sharing of information than older teams, which may be indicative of the development process. One of the hierarchical teams was engaged in more ‘system-driven’ activities than the heterarchical team studied at the same time of year. Finally, in general, the heterarchical team perceived a greater degree of team working culture than its hierarchical counterparts. This applied research project confirms findings from laboratory research and emphasizes the importance of involving ergonomics in the design of team working in human supervisory control

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__soton.ac.uk_ude_personalfiles_users_jr1d11_mydesktop_ePrints_A_field_study%20of%20team%20working%20A field study of team working in a new human supervisory control system.txt - Accepted Manuscript
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Published date: 10 November 2000
Organisations: Southampton Business School, Transportation Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 366924
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/366924
ISSN: 1366-5847
PURE UUID: 2e56746c-4427-4914-9a62-7f575c7288eb

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Date deposited: 17 Jul 2014 09:10
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 02:06

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