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Regular and novel metonymy: can you curl up with a good Agatha Christie in your second language?

Regular and novel metonymy: can you curl up with a good Agatha Christie in your second language?
Regular and novel metonymy: can you curl up with a good Agatha Christie in your second language?
This article presents results of two off-line comprehension tasks investigating the acceptability of unconventional and conventional metonymy by native speakers of Korean and Spanish who speak English as a second language. We are interested in discovering whether learners differentiate between conventional and unconventional metonymy, and whether the acceptability of metonymic expressions in the native language has an effect on learners’ judgments in the second language. The findings of this study constitute further experimental support for the psychological reality of the distinction between conventional and unconventional metonymy, but only in English. Learners of English at intermediate levels of proficiency exhibit transfer from the native language in comprehending metonymic shifts of meanings. Restructuring of the grammar is evident in later stages of development. Finally, complete success in acquiring L2 metonymic patterns is attested in our experimental study. Implications for L2A theories and teaching practices are discussed.
metonymy comprehension, conventional (regular) metonymy, unconventional metonymy, korean, spanish, english, bottleneck hypothesis
0142-6001
1-24
Slabakova, R.
1bda11ce-ce3d-4146-8ae3-4a486b6f5bde
Cabrelli Amaro, J.
2433f5f7-b579-4873-bf1a-54070541beda
Kyun Kang, S.
ec9b9eee-2e3a-4060-abcb-2182a5732738
Slabakova, R.
1bda11ce-ce3d-4146-8ae3-4a486b6f5bde
Cabrelli Amaro, J.
2433f5f7-b579-4873-bf1a-54070541beda
Kyun Kang, S.
ec9b9eee-2e3a-4060-abcb-2182a5732738

Slabakova, R., Cabrelli Amaro, J. and Kyun Kang, S. (2014) Regular and novel metonymy: can you curl up with a good Agatha Christie in your second language? Applied Linguistics, 1-24. (doi:10.1093/applin/amu003).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This article presents results of two off-line comprehension tasks investigating the acceptability of unconventional and conventional metonymy by native speakers of Korean and Spanish who speak English as a second language. We are interested in discovering whether learners differentiate between conventional and unconventional metonymy, and whether the acceptability of metonymic expressions in the native language has an effect on learners’ judgments in the second language. The findings of this study constitute further experimental support for the psychological reality of the distinction between conventional and unconventional metonymy, but only in English. Learners of English at intermediate levels of proficiency exhibit transfer from the native language in comprehending metonymic shifts of meanings. Restructuring of the grammar is evident in later stages of development. Finally, complete success in acquiring L2 metonymic patterns is attested in our experimental study. Implications for L2A theories and teaching practices are discussed.

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Published date: 10 April 2014
Keywords: metonymy comprehension, conventional (regular) metonymy, unconventional metonymy, korean, spanish, english, bottleneck hypothesis
Organisations: Modern Languages

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 367098
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/367098
ISSN: 0142-6001
PURE UUID: a0a456c9-7af6-4840-b047-b3ff6d02637a
ORCID for R. Slabakova: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5839-460X

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Date deposited: 22 Jul 2014 11:38
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:22

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