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The potters’ legacy: production, use and deposition of pottery in Kent, from the middle Bronze Age to the early Iron Age

The potters’ legacy: production, use and deposition of pottery in Kent, from the middle Bronze Age to the early Iron Age
The potters’ legacy: production, use and deposition of pottery in Kent, from the middle Bronze Age to the early Iron Age
The aim of this thesis is to provide a comprehensive study of prehistoric pottery throughout the region of Kent. Research will focus specifically on middle Bronze Age through to early/middle Iron Age pottery, a date range of approximately 1500 to 400 BC. The study of pottery offers a wealth of information relating to many aspects of the past and yet despite this, prehistoric pottery has been under-researched in Kent. A growing number of important pottery assemblages have been excavated and recent development-led archaeology has produced a great deal of new evidence from excavation and evaluation. This offers an important key to understanding the chronology and interpretation of settlement and burial sites.

The basis of this study is to analyse pottery assemblages in order to develop an understanding of the societies who produced and consumed the ceramics, and to provide the foundation for a ceramic typological and chronological framework. This was undertaken through the study of some 77,000 pottery sherds from 66 sites across the region. The data was collected from personally recording and illustrating large assemblages of pottery sherds and by using data from ‘grey literature’, published reports and research by a number of pottery specialists. A form type series was devised, which demonstrates the range of pottery types present in Kent from the middle Bronze Age to early/middle Iron Age. A chronological sequence has been tentatively suggested, which is in need of refinement when more radiocarbon dates are available. A fabric series has been created and presents a brief summary of the types of fabrics used to make the vessels.

Key areas were studied, namely, the production and distribution of the ceramics across Kent and how this compares to surrounding regions. Changes in both pottery form types and fabrics over 1000 years of potting history are evident and offer insights into the changing nature of social practises and settlement patterns. Consideration of how the ceramics have been deposited may also offer glimpses into the past, and also serve to highlight the complexities of site formation.

This study contributes to a growing body of research on the prehistory of Kent. The limitations are also addressed and the scope for further research.
McNee, Barbara
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McNee, Barbara
0f56c346-6a28-4268-8ffa-5ae737af1cda
Champion, Timothy
42a175cf-70ac-40fd-9a84-f544296f15df
Williams, David
0bf8fa7e-be48-4f06-988f-4457b0a0f8d0

(2012) The potters’ legacy: production, use and deposition of pottery in Kent, from the middle Bronze Age to the early Iron Age. University of Southampton, Faculty of Humanities, Doctoral Thesis, 511pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

The aim of this thesis is to provide a comprehensive study of prehistoric pottery throughout the region of Kent. Research will focus specifically on middle Bronze Age through to early/middle Iron Age pottery, a date range of approximately 1500 to 400 BC. The study of pottery offers a wealth of information relating to many aspects of the past and yet despite this, prehistoric pottery has been under-researched in Kent. A growing number of important pottery assemblages have been excavated and recent development-led archaeology has produced a great deal of new evidence from excavation and evaluation. This offers an important key to understanding the chronology and interpretation of settlement and burial sites.

The basis of this study is to analyse pottery assemblages in order to develop an understanding of the societies who produced and consumed the ceramics, and to provide the foundation for a ceramic typological and chronological framework. This was undertaken through the study of some 77,000 pottery sherds from 66 sites across the region. The data was collected from personally recording and illustrating large assemblages of pottery sherds and by using data from ‘grey literature’, published reports and research by a number of pottery specialists. A form type series was devised, which demonstrates the range of pottery types present in Kent from the middle Bronze Age to early/middle Iron Age. A chronological sequence has been tentatively suggested, which is in need of refinement when more radiocarbon dates are available. A fabric series has been created and presents a brief summary of the types of fabrics used to make the vessels.

Key areas were studied, namely, the production and distribution of the ceramics across Kent and how this compares to surrounding regions. Changes in both pottery form types and fabrics over 1000 years of potting history are evident and offer insights into the changing nature of social practises and settlement patterns. Consideration of how the ceramics have been deposited may also offer glimpses into the past, and also serve to highlight the complexities of site formation.

This study contributes to a growing body of research on the prehistory of Kent. The limitations are also addressed and the scope for further research.

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Published date: 2012
Organisations: University of Southampton, Archaeology

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Local EPrints ID: 367138
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/367138
PURE UUID: d4d8d05f-825d-4b5e-a9e8-639cc05090bc

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Date deposited: 23 Oct 2014 10:32
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 02:03

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