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Enhanced Debt Management: solving the eurozone crisis by linking debt management with fiscal and monetary policy

Enhanced Debt Management: solving the eurozone crisis by linking debt management with fiscal and monetary policy
Enhanced Debt Management: solving the eurozone crisis by linking debt management with fiscal and monetary policy
Unconventional approaches to suit unusual circumstances have become acceptable in monetary policy, a formerly highly conservative discipline. In this paper it is argued that unconventional approaches should also be considered in sovereign debt management, in order to contribute to resolving the eurozone sovereign debt crisis. First, the Troika crisis lending to indebted sovereign borrowers in the eurozone is reviewed and compared with standard IMF post-crisis lending. The main difference and shortcoming is the unsustainable character of the eurozone approach, due to the omission of demand stimulation components. To address this and other shortcomings, the features of an ideal alternative funding tool are identified. It would solve the funding problems of affected sovereigns, help stabilise the banking system, but most of all stimulate domestic demand and hence end the vicious downward spiral. It is found that this funding method can be implemented as part of enhanced public debt management by each nation’s debt management office.
bank credit, credit creation, enhanced debt management, public debt management, quantitative easing, quantity theory of credit
0261-5606
1-27
Werner, Richard A.
dc217378-eb19-4592-9be4-ab5f847b74a1
Werner, Richard A.
dc217378-eb19-4592-9be4-ab5f847b74a1

Werner, Richard A. (2014) Enhanced Debt Management: solving the eurozone crisis by linking debt management with fiscal and monetary policy. Journal of International Money and Finance, 1-27. (doi:10.1016/j.jimonfin.2014.06.007).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Unconventional approaches to suit unusual circumstances have become acceptable in monetary policy, a formerly highly conservative discipline. In this paper it is argued that unconventional approaches should also be considered in sovereign debt management, in order to contribute to resolving the eurozone sovereign debt crisis. First, the Troika crisis lending to indebted sovereign borrowers in the eurozone is reviewed and compared with standard IMF post-crisis lending. The main difference and shortcoming is the unsustainable character of the eurozone approach, due to the omission of demand stimulation components. To address this and other shortcomings, the features of an ideal alternative funding tool are identified. It would solve the funding problems of affected sovereigns, help stabilise the banking system, but most of all stimulate domestic demand and hence end the vicious downward spiral. It is found that this funding method can be implemented as part of enhanced public debt management by each nation’s debt management office.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 14 July 2014
Keywords: bank credit, credit creation, enhanced debt management, public debt management, quantitative easing, quantity theory of credit
Organisations: Centre for Digital, Interactive & Data Driven Marketing

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 367203
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/367203
ISSN: 0261-5606
PURE UUID: 467bc824-f081-48d4-a9f7-757821c109d1

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Date deposited: 24 Jul 2014 13:55
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 02:02

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