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Measuring barriers to adherence: validation of the problematic experiences of therapy scale

Measuring barriers to adherence: validation of the problematic experiences of therapy scale
Measuring barriers to adherence: validation of the problematic experiences of therapy scale
Purpose: To present the psychometric properties of the Problematic Experiences of Therapy Scale (the PETS), a brief measure to assess self-reported perceived barriers to adherence to physical rehabilitative therapy.

Methods: Participants (study 1: n?=?128, study 2: n?=?227) taking part in trials of rehabilitative exercises completed the PETS and adherence questions at 12 weeks. Participants in study 2 were also asked about maintained adherence at 6-month follow-up.

Results: Principal component analysis identified a four-factor structure relating to symptoms, uncertainty, doubts and practical problems. Cronbach's alphas ranged between 0.84 and 0.96 for study 1 and study 2. Correlations between factors varied, ranging between -0.22 and -0.53 for study 1, and 0.12 and 0.36 for study 2. Adherence was associated with all subscales at 12 weeks, and with the symptoms and doubts subscales at 6-months.

Conclusions: The PETS is a valid and reliable measure that can be used to assess participants' perceived reasons for non-adherence to a home-based rehabilitative therapy. It can be easily incorporated into treatment trials and as subscales were associated with reported adherence and maintained adherence, it provides potentially valuable indicators of reported barriers to adherence or might be used in clinical practice to facilitate conversations about adherence.

Implications for Rehabilitation

Low levels of adherence are commonly reported among people with chronic conditions who are required to undertake self-managed, home-based rehabilitation, yet patient-perceived barriers to adherence are rarely measured. The Problematic Experiences of Therapy Scale (the PETS) is a brief self-report measure that assesses the extent to which respondents perceive that they have been prevented from carrying out an intervention by common and plausible reasons. A patient-centered approach to reasons for non-adherence could facilitate conversations about adherence and identify areas in which the respondent may benefit from additional support or interventions to aid adherence.
compliance, exercise, problematic experiences of therapy scale, reliability, validity
0963-8288
1-6
Kirby, Sarah
9be57c1b-5ab7-4444-829e-d8e5dbe2370b
Donovan-Hall, Maggie
5f138055-2162-4982-846c-5c92411055e0
Yardley, Lucy
64be42c4-511d-484d-abaa-f8813452a22e
Kirby, Sarah
9be57c1b-5ab7-4444-829e-d8e5dbe2370b
Donovan-Hall, Maggie
5f138055-2162-4982-846c-5c92411055e0
Yardley, Lucy
64be42c4-511d-484d-abaa-f8813452a22e

Kirby, Sarah, Donovan-Hall, Maggie and Yardley, Lucy (2014) Measuring barriers to adherence: validation of the problematic experiences of therapy scale. Disability and Rehabilitation, 1-6. (doi:10.3109/09638288.2013.876106). (PMID:24410171)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose: To present the psychometric properties of the Problematic Experiences of Therapy Scale (the PETS), a brief measure to assess self-reported perceived barriers to adherence to physical rehabilitative therapy.

Methods: Participants (study 1: n?=?128, study 2: n?=?227) taking part in trials of rehabilitative exercises completed the PETS and adherence questions at 12 weeks. Participants in study 2 were also asked about maintained adherence at 6-month follow-up.

Results: Principal component analysis identified a four-factor structure relating to symptoms, uncertainty, doubts and practical problems. Cronbach's alphas ranged between 0.84 and 0.96 for study 1 and study 2. Correlations between factors varied, ranging between -0.22 and -0.53 for study 1, and 0.12 and 0.36 for study 2. Adherence was associated with all subscales at 12 weeks, and with the symptoms and doubts subscales at 6-months.

Conclusions: The PETS is a valid and reliable measure that can be used to assess participants' perceived reasons for non-adherence to a home-based rehabilitative therapy. It can be easily incorporated into treatment trials and as subscales were associated with reported adherence and maintained adherence, it provides potentially valuable indicators of reported barriers to adherence or might be used in clinical practice to facilitate conversations about adherence.

Implications for Rehabilitation

Low levels of adherence are commonly reported among people with chronic conditions who are required to undertake self-managed, home-based rehabilitation, yet patient-perceived barriers to adherence are rarely measured. The Problematic Experiences of Therapy Scale (the PETS) is a brief self-report measure that assesses the extent to which respondents perceive that they have been prevented from carrying out an intervention by common and plausible reasons. A patient-centered approach to reasons for non-adherence could facilitate conversations about adherence and identify areas in which the respondent may benefit from additional support or interventions to aid adherence.

Other
09638288.2013.876106 - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 12 December 2013
e-pub ahead of print date: 13 January 2014
Keywords: compliance, exercise, problematic experiences of therapy scale, reliability, validity
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences, Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 367220
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/367220
ISSN: 0963-8288
PURE UUID: ef330c01-4153-4630-9b72-53601ddcc576
ORCID for Sarah Kirby: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1759-1356
ORCID for Lucy Yardley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3853-883X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Jul 2014 11:37
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:11

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