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CAFE OF EVE: a method for designing and evaluating interfaces

CAFE OF EVE: a method for designing and evaluating interfaces
CAFE OF EVE: a method for designing and evaluating interfaces
Few would doubt the need for good interface design. When we use software over an extended period we may come to appreciate some aspects of the interface whilst abhorring others. We can also appreciate that some software packages are better than others although they perform essentially the same function. Intuitively, we are aware that good interface design enhances the usability of software and makes its functions more accessible to the user. The often quoted knock-on benefits include; greater productivity, fewer errors, and greater user satisfaction. What is needed however, is a mechanism for ensuring that newly designed software encapsulates the positive aspects of interface design whilst minimising the negative. This undertaking requires us to understand what is meant by usability. The CAFE OF EVE project seeks to draw together a normal working context and a controlled laboratory to create a special human factors environment, capitalising on the benefits of ecological validity and experimental control, while seeking to avoid the disadvantages of the two contrasting approaches. In so doing, the research benefits should surpass the benefits typically yielded by either approach taken separately or sequentially. What we are proposing and its emergent properties could constitute a minor revolution in human factors research
12/1-12/4
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Gale, Tony
5034e987-6304-4065-a8ee-f23fe7ce8acb
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Gale, Tony
5034e987-6304-4065-a8ee-f23fe7ce8acb

Stanton, Neville A. and Gale, Tony (1996) CAFE OF EVE: a method for designing and evaluating interfaces. IEE Colloquium on Interfaces - The Leading Edge, 12/1-12/4. (doi:10.1049/ic:19960800).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Few would doubt the need for good interface design. When we use software over an extended period we may come to appreciate some aspects of the interface whilst abhorring others. We can also appreciate that some software packages are better than others although they perform essentially the same function. Intuitively, we are aware that good interface design enhances the usability of software and makes its functions more accessible to the user. The often quoted knock-on benefits include; greater productivity, fewer errors, and greater user satisfaction. What is needed however, is a mechanism for ensuring that newly designed software encapsulates the positive aspects of interface design whilst minimising the negative. This undertaking requires us to understand what is meant by usability. The CAFE OF EVE project seeks to draw together a normal working context and a controlled laboratory to create a special human factors environment, capitalising on the benefits of ecological validity and experimental control, while seeking to avoid the disadvantages of the two contrasting approaches. In so doing, the research benefits should surpass the benefits typically yielded by either approach taken separately or sequentially. What we are proposing and its emergent properties could constitute a minor revolution in human factors research

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More information

Published date: 3 April 1996
Venue - Dates: IEE Colloquium on Interfaces - The Leading Edge, 1996-04-03
Organisations: Transportation Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 367271
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/367271
PURE UUID: f7032ee8-4741-40dc-b1c0-9c4906b50153
ORCID for Neville A. Stanton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8562-3279

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Sep 2014 10:03
Last modified: 19 Jun 2019 00:33

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