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Who cares? Implications of care-giving and -receiving by HIV-infected or -affected older people on functional disability and emotional wellbeing

Who cares? Implications of care-giving and -receiving by HIV-infected or -affected older people on functional disability and emotional wellbeing
Who cares? Implications of care-giving and -receiving by HIV-infected or -affected older people on functional disability and emotional wellbeing
This paper examines how care-giving to adults and/or children and care-receiving is associated with the health and wellbeing of older people aged 50+ in rural South Africa. Data used are from a cross-sectional survey adapted from World Health Organization's Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE) conducted in 2009/10 in rural South Africa. Bivariate statistics and multivariate logistical regression were used to assess the relationship between care-giving and/or care-receiving with functional disability, quality of life or emotional wellbeing, and self-rated health status, adjusted for socio-demographic factors. Sixty-three per cent of 422 older people were care-givers to at least one young adult or child; 27 per cent of older people were care-givers due to HIV-related reasons in young adults; 84 per cent of participants were care-recipients mainly from adult children, grandchildren and spouse. In logistic regressions adjusting for sex, age, marital status, education, receipt of grants, household headship, household wealth and HIV status, care-giving was statistically significantly associated with good functional ability as measured by ability to perform activities of daily living. This relationship was stronger for older people providing care-giving to adults than to children. In contrast, care-givers were less likely to report good emotional wellbeing; again the relationship was stronger for care-givers to adults than children. Simultaneous care-giving and -receiving was likewise associated with good functional ability, but about a 47 per cent lower chance of good emotional wellbeing. Participants who were HIV-infected were more likely to be in better health but less likely to be receiving care than those who were HIV-affected. Our findings suggest a strong relationship between care-giving and poor emotional wellbeing via an economic or psychological stressor pathway. Interventions that improve older people's socio-economic circumstances and reduce financial hardship as well as those that provide social support would go some way towards mitigating this relationship.
south africa, older people, care-giving, HIV-infected, self-reported health, functional disability, emotional wellbeing
1-34
Nyirenda, M.
cddac324-c50e-4551-87ee-3ae544ee4ee6
Evandrou, M.
cd2210ea-9625-44d7-b0f4-fc0721a25d28
Mutevezdi, P.
0652a583-f448-4fee-b086-75b662635306
Hosegood, V.
c59a89d5-5edc-42dd-b282-f44458fd2993
Falkingham, J.
8df36615-1547-4a6d-ad55-aa9496e85519
Newell, M.-L.
c6ff99dd-c23b-4fef-a846-a221fe2522b3
Nyirenda, M.
cddac324-c50e-4551-87ee-3ae544ee4ee6
Evandrou, M.
cd2210ea-9625-44d7-b0f4-fc0721a25d28
Mutevezdi, P.
0652a583-f448-4fee-b086-75b662635306
Hosegood, V.
c59a89d5-5edc-42dd-b282-f44458fd2993
Falkingham, J.
8df36615-1547-4a6d-ad55-aa9496e85519
Newell, M.-L.
c6ff99dd-c23b-4fef-a846-a221fe2522b3

Nyirenda, M., Evandrou, M., Mutevezdi, P., Hosegood, V., Falkingham, J. and Newell, M.-L. (2013) Who cares? Implications of care-giving and -receiving by HIV-infected or -affected older people on functional disability and emotional wellbeing. Ageing & Society, 1-34. (doi:10.1017/S0144686X13000615).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper examines how care-giving to adults and/or children and care-receiving is associated with the health and wellbeing of older people aged 50+ in rural South Africa. Data used are from a cross-sectional survey adapted from World Health Organization's Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE) conducted in 2009/10 in rural South Africa. Bivariate statistics and multivariate logistical regression were used to assess the relationship between care-giving and/or care-receiving with functional disability, quality of life or emotional wellbeing, and self-rated health status, adjusted for socio-demographic factors. Sixty-three per cent of 422 older people were care-givers to at least one young adult or child; 27 per cent of older people were care-givers due to HIV-related reasons in young adults; 84 per cent of participants were care-recipients mainly from adult children, grandchildren and spouse. In logistic regressions adjusting for sex, age, marital status, education, receipt of grants, household headship, household wealth and HIV status, care-giving was statistically significantly associated with good functional ability as measured by ability to perform activities of daily living. This relationship was stronger for older people providing care-giving to adults than to children. In contrast, care-givers were less likely to report good emotional wellbeing; again the relationship was stronger for care-givers to adults than children. Simultaneous care-giving and -receiving was likewise associated with good functional ability, but about a 47 per cent lower chance of good emotional wellbeing. Participants who were HIV-infected were more likely to be in better health but less likely to be receiving care than those who were HIV-affected. Our findings suggest a strong relationship between care-giving and poor emotional wellbeing via an economic or psychological stressor pathway. Interventions that improve older people's socio-economic circumstances and reduce financial hardship as well as those that provide social support would go some way towards mitigating this relationship.

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Published date: 4 September 2013
Keywords: south africa, older people, care-giving, HIV-infected, self-reported health, functional disability, emotional wellbeing
Organisations: Social Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 367365
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/367365
PURE UUID: 2bc42bd8-4d27-4cfb-8e62-f7413c0840dd
ORCID for M. Evandrou: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2115-9358
ORCID for V. Hosegood: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2244-2518
ORCID for J. Falkingham: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7135-5875
ORCID for M.-L. Newell: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1074-7699

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Jul 2014 15:57
Last modified: 21 Nov 2021 03:09

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Contributors

Author: M. Nyirenda
Author: M. Evandrou ORCID iD
Author: P. Mutevezdi
Author: V. Hosegood ORCID iD
Author: J. Falkingham ORCID iD
Author: M.-L. Newell ORCID iD

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