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Plant acclimation and adaptation to a high CO2 world

Plant acclimation and adaptation to a high CO2 world
Plant acclimation and adaptation to a high CO2 world
Plant adaptation to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is of great interest, as the concentration of this gas in the atmosphere has risen by more than 30% to 388 µmol mol-1 since the industrial revolution. On average there has been a rise of 3 ppm per year. Plant fossil samples suggest that atmospheric CO2 may be acting as a selective agent driving evolution, but limited evidence is available to support this idea that plants subjected to future predicted concentrations of carbon dioxide may adapt. In contrast, much evidence is available on plant acclimation mechanisms and phenotypinc plasticity in future high CO2 concentrations. Studying evolutionary responses to this aspect of environmental change is difficult, but here we use a CO2 spring site where plants have been exposed for multiple generations to concentrations of CO2 predicted for 2050. From this, detailed phenotyping data were collected, including data for stomatal patterning, photosynthetic performance and growth. Considerable evidence exists to show that stomatal numbers have declined across geological time and that this is linked to CO2 concentration, but few CO2-sensitive stomatal patterning genes have ever been identified. When grown under elevated CO2 concentrations P. lanceolata (the narrow leaf plantain), seeds collected from the spring site showed a counter-intuitive increase in stomatal index and density. Here, in this non-model plant we have investigated the gene expression changes underlying this stomatal patterning response to elevated CO2.

RNA-Seq allowed for in-depth analysis in P. lanceolata with no previous information required, enabling rapid evaluation of any of novel plant acclimation and adaption mechanisms. Using this approach we have identified a set of novel genes for stomatal patterning in high CO2 and confirmed previously observed acclimation responses.
Watson-Lazowski, Alex J.
46a8b78c-ca59-407b-bd73-02c3f0acc3f2
Lin, Yunan
71c147ff-0020-4648-acef-3f01d2c3242c
Edwards, Richard
9d25e74f-dc0d-455a-832c-5f363d864c43
DeWoody, Jennifer
6b58fbfe-e1db-4510-aa2a-914f2987f914
Miglietta, Franco
efe1ee52-c4f4-475b-8386-3550508e2d59
Chapman, Mark
8bac4a92-bfa7-4c3c-af29-9af852ef6383
Taylor, Gail
f3851db9-d37c-4c36-8663-e5c2cb03e171
Watson-Lazowski, Alex J.
46a8b78c-ca59-407b-bd73-02c3f0acc3f2
Lin, Yunan
71c147ff-0020-4648-acef-3f01d2c3242c
Edwards, Richard
9d25e74f-dc0d-455a-832c-5f363d864c43
DeWoody, Jennifer
6b58fbfe-e1db-4510-aa2a-914f2987f914
Miglietta, Franco
efe1ee52-c4f4-475b-8386-3550508e2d59
Chapman, Mark
8bac4a92-bfa7-4c3c-af29-9af852ef6383
Taylor, Gail
f3851db9-d37c-4c36-8663-e5c2cb03e171

Watson-Lazowski, Alex J., Lin, Yunan, Edwards, Richard, DeWoody, Jennifer, Miglietta, Franco, Chapman, Mark and Taylor, Gail (2014) Plant acclimation and adaptation to a high CO2 world. Plant & Animal Genome XXII, United States. 10 - 15 Jan 2014.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Plant adaptation to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is of great interest, as the concentration of this gas in the atmosphere has risen by more than 30% to 388 µmol mol-1 since the industrial revolution. On average there has been a rise of 3 ppm per year. Plant fossil samples suggest that atmospheric CO2 may be acting as a selective agent driving evolution, but limited evidence is available to support this idea that plants subjected to future predicted concentrations of carbon dioxide may adapt. In contrast, much evidence is available on plant acclimation mechanisms and phenotypinc plasticity in future high CO2 concentrations. Studying evolutionary responses to this aspect of environmental change is difficult, but here we use a CO2 spring site where plants have been exposed for multiple generations to concentrations of CO2 predicted for 2050. From this, detailed phenotyping data were collected, including data for stomatal patterning, photosynthetic performance and growth. Considerable evidence exists to show that stomatal numbers have declined across geological time and that this is linked to CO2 concentration, but few CO2-sensitive stomatal patterning genes have ever been identified. When grown under elevated CO2 concentrations P. lanceolata (the narrow leaf plantain), seeds collected from the spring site showed a counter-intuitive increase in stomatal index and density. Here, in this non-model plant we have investigated the gene expression changes underlying this stomatal patterning response to elevated CO2.

RNA-Seq allowed for in-depth analysis in P. lanceolata with no previous information required, enabling rapid evaluation of any of novel plant acclimation and adaption mechanisms. Using this approach we have identified a set of novel genes for stomatal patterning in high CO2 and confirmed previously observed acclimation responses.

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More information

Published date: 11 January 2014
Venue - Dates: Plant & Animal Genome XXII, United States, 2014-01-10 - 2014-01-15
Organisations: Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 367411
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/367411
PURE UUID: 6b8f4169-e1f8-4262-8921-c66696f7c92d
ORCID for Mark Chapman: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7151-723X
ORCID for Gail Taylor: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8470-6390

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 Jul 2014 14:16
Last modified: 25 May 2019 00:36

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