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Comparison of foot pain and foot care among rheumatoid arthritis patients taking and not taking anti-TNF? therapy: an epidemiological study

Comparison of foot pain and foot care among rheumatoid arthritis patients taking and not taking anti-TNF? therapy: an epidemiological study
Comparison of foot pain and foot care among rheumatoid arthritis patients taking and not taking anti-TNF? therapy: an epidemiological study
Epidemiological studies report foot pain affects more than 90% of people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Most data about foot involvement in RA were collected prior to the availability of novel treatments such as biologics. The objective of this study is to compare the prevalence of foot symptoms, frequency of foot examination, and access to foot care services among RA patients currently treated with anti-TNF? to those not receiving biologics. This study is a cross-sectional epidemiological study: a 28-item self-administered questionnaire was posted to 1,040 people with RA throughout the UK. Overall, 585 (55%) useable replies were received, and 120 (20.5%) respondents were currently taking anti-TNF? medication. Prevalence of current foot pain was 99% among the biologics group compared with 76% not treated with biologics. Stiffness, swelling, and numbness in the feet were all significantly more common in the anti-TNF? group (P < 0.05). Most respondents (90%) taking biologics discussed their foot pain with their rheumatologist, but only 70% were receiving podiatry (compared to 78% not taking anti-TNF?). Subjects reported that their feet were examined significantly less frequently (P < 0.001) than their hands. Foot complaints are common in this group, and allied health professions could enhance rheumatological care by undertaking foot assessment.
rheumatoid arthritis, foot pain, anti-TNF?
0172-8172
1515-1519
Otter, S.J.
182df1cb-b90b-444c-ab3b-330a4505907e
Lucas, K.
e343d01c-df33-4e28-a99c-d57d2d16e5bd
Springett, K.
f7168874-ea7b-4f80-b4d2-37fb2faea7de
Moore, A..
182c8d17-be65-4da7-be61-d8670bd8094f
Davies, K.
d9c4d70d-b2c0-4952-b59d-bd4dd5083331
Young, A.J.
3bde9f79-98e5-4d0c-a15d-16b366c9db31
Walker-Bone, K.
ad7d1336-ed2c-4f39-ade5-da84eb412109
Otter, S.J.
182df1cb-b90b-444c-ab3b-330a4505907e
Lucas, K.
e343d01c-df33-4e28-a99c-d57d2d16e5bd
Springett, K.
f7168874-ea7b-4f80-b4d2-37fb2faea7de
Moore, A..
182c8d17-be65-4da7-be61-d8670bd8094f
Davies, K.
d9c4d70d-b2c0-4952-b59d-bd4dd5083331
Young, A.J.
3bde9f79-98e5-4d0c-a15d-16b366c9db31
Walker-Bone, K.
ad7d1336-ed2c-4f39-ade5-da84eb412109

Otter, S.J., Lucas, K., Springett, K., Moore, A.., Davies, K., Young, A.J. and Walker-Bone, K. (2011) Comparison of foot pain and foot care among rheumatoid arthritis patients taking and not taking anti-TNF? therapy: an epidemiological study. Rheumatology International, 31 (11), 1515-1519. (doi:10.1007/s00296-010-1700-2). (PMID:21153824)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Epidemiological studies report foot pain affects more than 90% of people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Most data about foot involvement in RA were collected prior to the availability of novel treatments such as biologics. The objective of this study is to compare the prevalence of foot symptoms, frequency of foot examination, and access to foot care services among RA patients currently treated with anti-TNF? to those not receiving biologics. This study is a cross-sectional epidemiological study: a 28-item self-administered questionnaire was posted to 1,040 people with RA throughout the UK. Overall, 585 (55%) useable replies were received, and 120 (20.5%) respondents were currently taking anti-TNF? medication. Prevalence of current foot pain was 99% among the biologics group compared with 76% not treated with biologics. Stiffness, swelling, and numbness in the feet were all significantly more common in the anti-TNF? group (P < 0.05). Most respondents (90%) taking biologics discussed their foot pain with their rheumatologist, but only 70% were receiving podiatry (compared to 78% not taking anti-TNF?). Subjects reported that their feet were examined significantly less frequently (P < 0.001) than their hands. Foot complaints are common in this group, and allied health professions could enhance rheumatological care by undertaking foot assessment.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 14 December 2010
Published date: November 2011
Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis, foot pain, anti-TNF?
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 367512
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/367512
ISSN: 0172-8172
PURE UUID: 9ce3eaac-ae0e-42c6-8f9c-c30776753054
ORCID for K. Walker-Bone: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5992-1459

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Date deposited: 02 Sep 2014 11:37
Last modified: 22 Oct 2019 00:49

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Contributors

Author: S.J. Otter
Author: K. Lucas
Author: K. Springett
Author: A.. Moore
Author: K. Davies
Author: A.J. Young
Author: K. Walker-Bone ORCID iD

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