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Fully resolved simulation of particle deposition and heat transfer in a differentially heated cavity

Fully resolved simulation of particle deposition and heat transfer in a differentially heated cavity
Fully resolved simulation of particle deposition and heat transfer in a differentially heated cavity
In this paper a fictitious domain method is used to study the motion of particles in a differentially heated cavity. A collision strategy is implemented which is validated using the problem of two freely falling particles with natural convection taking place from the leading hot particle. The motion of the particles in a differentially heated cavity is considered where the vertical walls are subject to a temperature difference ?T?T whereas horizontal walls are assumed to be adiabatic. Depending on the fluid Grashof number different flow regimes and two critical Grashof numbers are identified. Sustained motion of the suspended particles is also studied and different behaviour is observed compared to the limiting case of tracer particles where simulations are usually performed using one-way coupled point-particle assumptions. Finally the effects of the particles on the heat transfer from the hot wall are studied and it is found that addition of large particles can adversely influence the heat transfer rate. However, if hot particles are effectively removed from the wall, e.g. by increasing the Grashof number, wall heat transfer properties can still be enhanced.
particulate flow, fictitious domain, GPU acceleration, differentially heated cavity, natural convection, direct numerical simulation
0142-727X
1-15
Haeri, S.
8e2f9ded-d4c7-4ae3-9fdb-db91f5f9ba9e
Shrimpton, J.S.
9cf82d2e-2f00-4ddf-bd19-9aff443784af
Haeri, S.
8e2f9ded-d4c7-4ae3-9fdb-db91f5f9ba9e
Shrimpton, J.S.
9cf82d2e-2f00-4ddf-bd19-9aff443784af

Haeri, S. and Shrimpton, J.S. (2014) Fully resolved simulation of particle deposition and heat transfer in a differentially heated cavity. International Journal of Heat and Fluid Flow, 1-15. (doi:10.1016/j.ijheatfluidflow.2014.04.009).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In this paper a fictitious domain method is used to study the motion of particles in a differentially heated cavity. A collision strategy is implemented which is validated using the problem of two freely falling particles with natural convection taking place from the leading hot particle. The motion of the particles in a differentially heated cavity is considered where the vertical walls are subject to a temperature difference ?T?T whereas horizontal walls are assumed to be adiabatic. Depending on the fluid Grashof number different flow regimes and two critical Grashof numbers are identified. Sustained motion of the suspended particles is also studied and different behaviour is observed compared to the limiting case of tracer particles where simulations are usually performed using one-way coupled point-particle assumptions. Finally the effects of the particles on the heat transfer from the hot wall are studied and it is found that addition of large particles can adversely influence the heat transfer rate. However, if hot particles are effectively removed from the wall, e.g. by increasing the Grashof number, wall heat transfer properties can still be enhanced.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 9 June 2014
Published date: December 2014
Keywords: particulate flow, fictitious domain, GPU acceleration, differentially heated cavity, natural convection, direct numerical simulation
Organisations: Aeronautics, Astronautics & Comp. Eng

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 367572
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/367572
ISSN: 0142-727X
PURE UUID: b8aeeaec-c877-448a-99d7-1b5632d4fb46

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Aug 2014 12:09
Last modified: 01 Aug 2018 16:31

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Contributors

Author: S. Haeri
Author: J.S. Shrimpton

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