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Investigation of the rapid fabrication of multiple nanofoam materials via femtosecond laser irradiation

Investigation of the rapid fabrication of multiple nanofoam materials via femtosecond laser irradiation
Investigation of the rapid fabrication of multiple nanofoam materials via femtosecond laser irradiation
Nanofoams are permeable, nanostructured materials, which have applications in many areas, including electronics, biological sciences and aerospace engineering [1-4]. Nanofoam fabrication using an ultrafast laser enables control over the precise location as well as the fabrication rate, leading to the possibility of applications such as evanescent sensors and energy harvesting devices. Here, we extend our initial work on glass nanofoam fabrication [5] by demonstrating the production of metal, ceramic, polymer and novel chalcogenide glass nanofoam at atmospheric pressure, with dimensions of ~hundred microns in height and millimetre-square in area. Our investigation showed that both the volume and density of the nanofoam was a function of both the material as well as the exposure protocol (number of pulses and their energy density).
Grant-Jacob, J.A.
c5d144d8-3c43-4195-8e80-edd96bfda91b
Mills, B.
05f1886e-96ef-420f-b856-4115f4ab36d0
Eason, R.W.
e38684c3-d18c-41b9-a4aa-def67283b020
Grant-Jacob, J.A.
c5d144d8-3c43-4195-8e80-edd96bfda91b
Mills, B.
05f1886e-96ef-420f-b856-4115f4ab36d0
Eason, R.W.
e38684c3-d18c-41b9-a4aa-def67283b020

Grant-Jacob, J.A., Mills, B. and Eason, R.W. (2014) Investigation of the rapid fabrication of multiple nanofoam materials via femtosecond laser irradiation. Materials Research Society Spring Meeting E-MRS '14. 26 - 30 May 2014.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Nanofoams are permeable, nanostructured materials, which have applications in many areas, including electronics, biological sciences and aerospace engineering [1-4]. Nanofoam fabrication using an ultrafast laser enables control over the precise location as well as the fabrication rate, leading to the possibility of applications such as evanescent sensors and energy harvesting devices. Here, we extend our initial work on glass nanofoam fabrication [5] by demonstrating the production of metal, ceramic, polymer and novel chalcogenide glass nanofoam at atmospheric pressure, with dimensions of ~hundred microns in height and millimetre-square in area. Our investigation showed that both the volume and density of the nanofoam was a function of both the material as well as the exposure protocol (number of pulses and their energy density).

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: May 2014
Venue - Dates: Materials Research Society Spring Meeting E-MRS '14, 2014-05-26 - 2014-05-30
Organisations: Optoelectronics Research Centre

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 367783
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/367783
PURE UUID: e73c2d88-4363-4564-ad8c-8ab6878ee6e6
ORCID for J.A. Grant-Jacob: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4270-4247
ORCID for B. Mills: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1784-1012
ORCID for R.W. Eason: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9704-2204

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Sep 2014 13:25
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:15

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