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Femtosecond laser materials processing using a digital micromirror device

Femtosecond laser materials processing using a digital micromirror device
Femtosecond laser materials processing using a digital micromirror device
We present the results of our work using a Texas Instruments digital multimirror device (DMD: a pixelated programmable mirror array) for applications in femtosecond materials processing. Unlike other techniques such as electron beam lithography or focussed ion beam processing, DMD-based laser processing allows image field sizes of ~30µm2 to be processed using a single femtosecond laser pulse. When combined with step-and-repeat techniques, at laser repetition rates of 1kHz and single pulse energies of ~1mJ, final patterned areas of around 1cm2 with sub-micron resolution could be achieved within reasonable (less than 1 hour) time scales.
We have used DMD-based highly demagnified image projection for ablation, multiphoton polymerisation and laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT). Using 800nm femtosecond laser pulses, we have so far produced features by ablation with linewidths of ~400nm in 300 nm thick films, and achieved sub-micron feature sizes in 10 µm thick photoresist via multiphoton processing. For LIFT, we have successfully printed solid-phase materials with few µm feature sizes, and are currently investigating the final aspect ratio (width-to-thickness of printed deposits) that is achievable without causing undesirable shattering or damage. We are also evaluating the role of single pulse versus multipulse exposure for ablation and polymerisation.
For all three techniques, we are evaluating the ultimate resolution and feature sizes achievable, and also (for LIFT) the possibility of stacking deposits to form complex 3-dimensional structures of few µm dimensions. We see DMD-based laser microfabrication as a future technology platform for high-value manufacturing, and during the talk will outline our future plans and current thinking on routine incorporation of DMD technology into laser-based microprocessing workstations.
Eason, R.W.
e38684c3-d18c-41b9-a4aa-def67283b020
Mills, B.
05f1886e-96ef-420f-b856-4115f4ab36d0
Feinäugle, M.
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Sones, C.L.
9de9d8ee-d394-46a5-80b7-e341c0eed0a8
Grant-Jacob, J.A.
c5d144d8-3c43-4195-8e80-edd96bfda91b
Eason, R.W.
e38684c3-d18c-41b9-a4aa-def67283b020
Mills, B.
05f1886e-96ef-420f-b856-4115f4ab36d0
Feinäugle, M.
3b15dc5b-ff52-4232-9632-b1be238a750c
Sones, C.L.
9de9d8ee-d394-46a5-80b7-e341c0eed0a8
Grant-Jacob, J.A.
c5d144d8-3c43-4195-8e80-edd96bfda91b

Eason, R.W., Mills, B., Feinäugle, M., Sones, C.L. and Grant-Jacob, J.A. (2013) Femtosecond laser materials processing using a digital micromirror device. EUROMAT Symposium: A1.I Ultrafast Laser Processing and Functionalization of Materials for Technological Applications, Spain. 08 - 13 May 2013.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

We present the results of our work using a Texas Instruments digital multimirror device (DMD: a pixelated programmable mirror array) for applications in femtosecond materials processing. Unlike other techniques such as electron beam lithography or focussed ion beam processing, DMD-based laser processing allows image field sizes of ~30µm2 to be processed using a single femtosecond laser pulse. When combined with step-and-repeat techniques, at laser repetition rates of 1kHz and single pulse energies of ~1mJ, final patterned areas of around 1cm2 with sub-micron resolution could be achieved within reasonable (less than 1 hour) time scales.
We have used DMD-based highly demagnified image projection for ablation, multiphoton polymerisation and laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT). Using 800nm femtosecond laser pulses, we have so far produced features by ablation with linewidths of ~400nm in 300 nm thick films, and achieved sub-micron feature sizes in 10 µm thick photoresist via multiphoton processing. For LIFT, we have successfully printed solid-phase materials with few µm feature sizes, and are currently investigating the final aspect ratio (width-to-thickness of printed deposits) that is achievable without causing undesirable shattering or damage. We are also evaluating the role of single pulse versus multipulse exposure for ablation and polymerisation.
For all three techniques, we are evaluating the ultimate resolution and feature sizes achievable, and also (for LIFT) the possibility of stacking deposits to form complex 3-dimensional structures of few µm dimensions. We see DMD-based laser microfabrication as a future technology platform for high-value manufacturing, and during the talk will outline our future plans and current thinking on routine incorporation of DMD technology into laser-based microprocessing workstations.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: May 2013
Venue - Dates: EUROMAT Symposium: A1.I Ultrafast Laser Processing and Functionalization of Materials for Technological Applications, Spain, 2013-05-08 - 2013-05-13
Organisations: Optoelectronics Research Centre

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 367792
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/367792
PURE UUID: 4560ccf4-39d9-42dc-84df-93d1a7443bc4
ORCID for R.W. Eason: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9704-2204
ORCID for B. Mills: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1784-1012
ORCID for J.A. Grant-Jacob: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4270-4247

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Sep 2014 13:33
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:15

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