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Epigenetic priming of the metabolic syndrome

Epigenetic priming of the metabolic syndrome
Epigenetic priming of the metabolic syndrome
The metabolic syndrome (MetS) represents a cluster of cardiometabolic risk factors, including central obesity, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, hyperinsulinemia and microalbuminuria, and more recently, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) and atherosclerosis. Although the concept of the MetS is subject to debate due to lack of a unifying underlying mechanism, the prevalence of a metabolic syndrome phenotype is rapidly increasing worldwide. Moreover, it is increasingly prevalent in children and adolescents of obese mothers. Evidence from both epidemiological and experimental animal studies now demonstrates that MetS onset is increasingly likely following exposure to suboptimal nutrition during critical periods of development, as observed in maternal obesity. Thus, the developmental priming of the MetS provides a common origin for this multifactorial disorder. Consequently, the mechanisms leading to this developmental priming have recently been the subject of intensive investigation. This review discusses recent data regarding the epigenetic modifications resulting from nutrition during early development that mediate persistent changes in the expression of key metabolic genes and contribute toward an adult metabolic syndrome phenotype. In addition, this review considers the role of the endogenous molecular circadian clock system, which has the potential to act at the interface between nutrient sensing and epigenetic processing. A continued and greater understanding of these mechanisms will eventually aid in the identification of individuals at high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes, and help develop therapeutic interventions, in accordance with current global government strategy.

1537-6524
353-361
Bruce, Kimberley D.
2065fe20-0e9e-4f1a-8463-71b832776fa1
Cagampang, Felino R.
7cf57d52-4a65-4554-8306-ed65226bc50e
Bruce, Kimberley D.
2065fe20-0e9e-4f1a-8463-71b832776fa1
Cagampang, Felino R.
7cf57d52-4a65-4554-8306-ed65226bc50e

Bruce, Kimberley D. and Cagampang, Felino R. (2011) Epigenetic priming of the metabolic syndrome. Toxicology Mechanisms and Methods, 21 (4), 353-361. (doi:10.3109/15376516.2011.559370). (PMID:21495873)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The metabolic syndrome (MetS) represents a cluster of cardiometabolic risk factors, including central obesity, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, hyperinsulinemia and microalbuminuria, and more recently, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) and atherosclerosis. Although the concept of the MetS is subject to debate due to lack of a unifying underlying mechanism, the prevalence of a metabolic syndrome phenotype is rapidly increasing worldwide. Moreover, it is increasingly prevalent in children and adolescents of obese mothers. Evidence from both epidemiological and experimental animal studies now demonstrates that MetS onset is increasingly likely following exposure to suboptimal nutrition during critical periods of development, as observed in maternal obesity. Thus, the developmental priming of the MetS provides a common origin for this multifactorial disorder. Consequently, the mechanisms leading to this developmental priming have recently been the subject of intensive investigation. This review discusses recent data regarding the epigenetic modifications resulting from nutrition during early development that mediate persistent changes in the expression of key metabolic genes and contribute toward an adult metabolic syndrome phenotype. In addition, this review considers the role of the endogenous molecular circadian clock system, which has the potential to act at the interface between nutrient sensing and epigenetic processing. A continued and greater understanding of these mechanisms will eventually aid in the identification of individuals at high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes, and help develop therapeutic interventions, in accordance with current global government strategy.

Text
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Published date: May 2011
Organisations: Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 367820
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/367820
ISSN: 1537-6524
PURE UUID: 74bfde07-42dc-469b-bed7-c34d93cfd343
ORCID for Felino R. Cagampang: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4404-9853

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Date deposited: 07 Aug 2014 13:46
Last modified: 29 Oct 2019 01:53

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