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Arthritic pain is processed in brain areas concerned with emotions and fear

Arthritic pain is processed in brain areas concerned with emotions and fear
Arthritic pain is processed in brain areas concerned with emotions and fear
Objective: functional neuroimaging studies have shown that experimentally induced acute pain is processed within at least 2 parallel networks of brain structures collectively known as the pain matrix. The relevance of this finding to clinical pain is not known, because no direct comparisons of experimental and clinical pain have been performed in the same group of patients. The aim of this study was to compare directly the brain areas involved in processing arthritic pain and experimental pain in a group of patients with osteoarthritis (OA).

Methods: twelve patients with knee OA underwent positron emission tomography of the brain, using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Scanning was performed during 3 different pain states: arthritic knee pain, experimental knee pain, and pain-free. Significant differences in the neuronal uptake of FDG between different pain states were investigated using statistical parametric mapping software.

Results: both pain conditions activated the pain matrix, but arthritic pain was associated with increased activity in the cingulate cortex, the thalamus, and the amygdala; these areas are involved in the processing of fear, emotions, and in aversive conditioning.

Conclusion: our results suggest that studies of experimental pain provide a relevant but quantitatively incomplete picture of brain activity during arthritic pain. The search for new analgesics for arthritis that act on the brain should focus on drugs that modify this circuitry
0004-3591
1345-1354
Kulkarni, B.
5edb6fd7-e651-4f5c-9836-7e7ae38e0701
Bentley, D.E.
c8e9f9ce-550c-4d9b-87b8-31255c56a3dd
Elliott, R.
bc8cbd83-773e-4cd7-9441-c5a3a2d657cb
Julyan, P.J.
c463dc05-9494-4ddd-aad0-3b1a5b24adca
Boger, E.
00d7d859-085e-40b4-8a61-bcb1995f27c9
Watson, A.
4d9afc3b-0d33-48b7-996a-6f8637697ad3
Boyle, Y.
ef33f646-560e-4f84-8455-676445699492
El-Deredy, W.
f0436d02-50dc-485a-a2be-c039c1e815ff
Jones, A.K.P.
dbe98f3f-2e3a-43e9-ade6-ebb96e856d44
Kulkarni, B.
5edb6fd7-e651-4f5c-9836-7e7ae38e0701
Bentley, D.E.
c8e9f9ce-550c-4d9b-87b8-31255c56a3dd
Elliott, R.
bc8cbd83-773e-4cd7-9441-c5a3a2d657cb
Julyan, P.J.
c463dc05-9494-4ddd-aad0-3b1a5b24adca
Boger, E.
00d7d859-085e-40b4-8a61-bcb1995f27c9
Watson, A.
4d9afc3b-0d33-48b7-996a-6f8637697ad3
Boyle, Y.
ef33f646-560e-4f84-8455-676445699492
El-Deredy, W.
f0436d02-50dc-485a-a2be-c039c1e815ff
Jones, A.K.P.
dbe98f3f-2e3a-43e9-ade6-ebb96e856d44

Kulkarni, B., Bentley, D.E., Elliott, R., Julyan, P.J., Boger, E., Watson, A., Boyle, Y., El-Deredy, W. and Jones, A.K.P. (2007) Arthritic pain is processed in brain areas concerned with emotions and fear. Arthritis & Rheumatism, 56 (4), 1345-1354. (doi:10.1002/art.22460). (PMID:17393440)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: functional neuroimaging studies have shown that experimentally induced acute pain is processed within at least 2 parallel networks of brain structures collectively known as the pain matrix. The relevance of this finding to clinical pain is not known, because no direct comparisons of experimental and clinical pain have been performed in the same group of patients. The aim of this study was to compare directly the brain areas involved in processing arthritic pain and experimental pain in a group of patients with osteoarthritis (OA).

Methods: twelve patients with knee OA underwent positron emission tomography of the brain, using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Scanning was performed during 3 different pain states: arthritic knee pain, experimental knee pain, and pain-free. Significant differences in the neuronal uptake of FDG between different pain states were investigated using statistical parametric mapping software.

Results: both pain conditions activated the pain matrix, but arthritic pain was associated with increased activity in the cingulate cortex, the thalamus, and the amygdala; these areas are involved in the processing of fear, emotions, and in aversive conditioning.

Conclusion: our results suggest that studies of experimental pain provide a relevant but quantitatively incomplete picture of brain activity during arthritic pain. The search for new analgesics for arthritis that act on the brain should focus on drugs that modify this circuitry

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 28 March 2007
Published date: April 2007
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

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Local EPrints ID: 367870
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/367870
ISSN: 0004-3591
PURE UUID: 6fd92ccd-f9aa-4217-94e5-f968f1c3f0fb

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Date deposited: 12 Sep 2014 07:41
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 21:48

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Contributors

Author: B. Kulkarni
Author: D.E. Bentley
Author: R. Elliott
Author: P.J. Julyan
Author: E. Boger
Author: A. Watson
Author: Y. Boyle
Author: W. El-Deredy
Author: A.K.P. Jones

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